EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle French social, from Latin sociālis (of or belonging to a companion or companionship or association, social), from socius (a companion, fellow, partner, associate, ally), from sequor (follow). Cognate with English seg (man, companion, fellow). More at seg.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈsəʊʃəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈsoʊ.ʃəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊʃəl

AdjectiveEdit

social (comparative more social, superlative most social)

  1. Being extroverted or outgoing.
    James is a very social guy; he knows lots of people.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, Chapter 1:
      Not ignoring what is good, I am quick to perceive a horror, and could still be social with it—would they let me—since it is but well to be on friendly terms with all the inmates of the place one lodges in.
  2. Of or relating to society.
    • 2012 January 1, Donald Worster, “A Drier and Hotter Future”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 1, page 70:
      Phoenix and Lubbock are both caught in severe drought, and it is going to get much worse. We may see many such [dust] storms in the decades ahead, along with species extinctions, radical disturbance of ecosystems, and intensified social conflict over land and water. Welcome to the Anthropocene, the epoch when humans have become a major geological and climatic force.
    Teresa feels uncomfortable in certain social situations.
    Unemployment is a social problem.
  3. (Internet) Relating to social media or social networks.
    social gaming
  4. (rare) Relating to a nation's allies.
    the Social War
  5. (botany, zoology) Cooperating or growing in groups.
    a social insect

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

social (countable and uncountable, plural socials)

  1. A festive gathering to foster introductions.
    They organized a social at the dance club to get people to know each other.
  2. (Canadian Prairies) A dance held to raise money for a couple to be married.
  3. (Britain, colloquial, with definite article) Clipping of social security.
    Fred hated going down to the social to sign on.
  4. (US, colloquial) Clipping of social security number.
    What's your social?
  5. (dated, Ireland) A dinner dance event, usually held annually by a company or sporting club.
  6. (Canada) Clipping of social studies.
  7. (Internet) Clipping of social media.
  8. (Internet) A social media account.
    • 2019 August 29, Randy Rainbow (lyrics), Andrew Lloyd Webber (music), “Cheeto Christ Stupid Czar”‎[2], performed by Randy Rainbow:
      Close your mouth and delete all your socials tonight.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sociālis.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

AdjectiveEdit

social (epicene, plural sociales)

  1. social

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sociālis, attested from 1803.[1]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

social (masculine and feminine plural socials)

  1. social

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “social” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French social, from Latin sociālis (concerning a partner or an ally), an adjective derived from the noun socius (partner, ally).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [soˈɕæˀl], [ɕoˈɕæˀl]

AdjectiveEdit

social (neuter socialt, plural and definite singular attributive sociale)

  1. social
  2. sociable

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sociālis (of or belonging to a companion, companionship or association, social), from socius (a companion, ally).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

social (feminine singular sociale, masculine plural sociaux, feminine plural sociales)

  1. social, related to society, community
    Un devoir social.
    A social obligation.
  2. social, living in society
    l'homme est un animal social.
    Man is a social animal.
  3. mundane, related to social life
    • 1922, Marcel Proust, Fugitive:
      Était-ce parce que la vie sociale de Gilberte devait présenter les mêmes contrastes que celle de Swann ?
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

social m (plural sociaux)

  1. action intended to make society work better
    faire du social.

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sociālis.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

AdjectiveEdit

social m or f (plural sociais)

  1. social

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ellipsis of social network.

NounEdit

social m (plural social)

  1. social network
    • 2019 October 1, “Zuckerberg è pronto alla battaglia contro Warren e TikTok (e Facebook non perde utenti)”, in Corriere della Sera[3]:
      TikTok è sia la prima piattaforma cinese a imporsi nel resto del mondo sia l’unico social a ottenere numeri finora inanellati solo da Menlo Park (500 milioni di utenti), eppure non sembra causare particolari grattacapi.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. (in the plural) social media
    postare sui socialto post on social media
    • 2018 January 25, ““Un inconveniente tecnico”: il tweet di Trenord fa infuriare i social, poi le scuse”, in La Stampa[4]:
      «Circolazione interrotta tra Treviglio e Milano a causa di un inconveniente tecnico a un treno»: è il tweet di Trenord delle 8.09 che ha fatto infuriare i social dopo il deragliamento a Seggiano di Pioltello.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

First known attestation 1355[1], borrowed from Latin sociālis.

AdjectiveEdit

social m (feminine singular sociale, masculine plural sociaulx, feminine plural sociales)

  1. allied (on the same side)
  2. social (tending to spend time with others)

DescendantsEdit

  • English: social
  • French: social

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ social” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).
  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (social, supplement)

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sociālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

social m (feminine singular sociala, masculine plural socials, feminine plural socialas)

  1. social (relating to society)

PiedmonteseEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

social

  1. social

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sociālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

social m or f (plural sociais, comparable)

  1. social (relating to society)
  2. (business) social (relating to business firms)
  3. social; outgoing; extroverted
    Synonyms: sociável, extrovertido
    Antonyms: anti-social, associal
  4. (ecology) social (living in large groups)
  5. for use by the residents of an apartment block, as opposed to maintenance workers or deliverymen
    Elevador social.
    Residents’ lift.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

social m, f (plural sociais)

  1. (Brazil, informal) a small party between close people or friends

Further readingEdit

  • social in Dicionário Aberto based on Novo Diccionário da Língua Portuguesa de Cândido de Figueiredo, 1913

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French social.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

social m or n (feminine singular socială, masculine plural sociali, feminine and neuter plural sociale)

  1. social (of or relating to society)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sociālis (of or belonging to a companion, companionship or association, social), from socius (a companion, ally).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

social (plural sociales)

  1. social

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sosiˈɑːl/, /soˈɧɑːl/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

social (not comparable)

  1. (not comparable) social, pertaining to living conditions and society (of an issue)
  2. social, kind, friendly, welcoming (of a person)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of social
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular social mer social mest social
Neuter singular socialt mer socialt mest socialt
Plural sociala mer sociala mest sociala
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 sociale mer sociale mest sociale
All sociala mer sociala mest sociala
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit