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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French matrone, Latin matrona (married woman), from mater (mother)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

matron (plural matrons)

  1. A mature or old woman.
    • Thomas Fuller (1606-1661)
      grave from her cradle, insomuch that she was a matron before she was a mother
  2. A wife or a widow, especially, one who has borne children.
  3. A woman of staid or motherly manners.
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      your wives, your daughters, your matrons, and your maids
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter IX, in The Younger Set (Project Gutenberg; EBook #14852), New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, published 1 February 2005 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 24962326:
      “A tight little craft,” was Austin’s invariable comment on the matron; and she looked it, always trim and trig and smooth of surface like a converted yacht cleared for action. ¶ Near her wandered her husband, orientally bland, invariably affable, [].
  4. A housekeeper, especially, a woman who manages the domestic economy of a public institution.
  5. A senior female nurse in an establishment, especially a hospital or school.
    the matron of a school or hospital
  6. (US) A female prison officer.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

matron in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913