Open main menu

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

mett (plural metts)

  1. (historical) An old English measure of volume, perhaps equal to two bushels.
    • 1866, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 1, p. 168:
      Once the mitta, or mett, a quantity of two bushels, is used for salt. The name still lingers in Lancashire.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse mettr

AdjectiveEdit

mett (neuter singular mett, definite singular and plural mette, comparative mettere, indefinite superlative mettest, definite superlative metteste)

  1. satisfied, full, full up (having eaten enough food)

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

mett

  1. imperative of mette

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mettr

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mett (neuter singular mett, definite singular and plural mette, comparative mettare, indefinite superlative mettast, definite superlative mettaste)

  1. satisfied, full, full up (having eaten enough food)

VerbEdit

mett

  1. imperative of metta

ReferencesEdit