See also: 'midst

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English middes, midst, myddest (middle), from Old English midde, reshaped in Middle English phrases like in middes (in the middle) by analogy with adverbs in -(e)s; also compare Old English on middan, tōmiddes. Forms in -(e)st are probably due to influence of superlatives.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɪdst/, [mɪdst], [mɪtst]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪdst

NounEdit

midst (plural midsts)

  1. (often literary) A place in the middle of something; may be used of a literal or metaphorical location.
    • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 2, in The Affair at the Novelty Theatre[1]:
      Miss Phyllis Morgan, as the hapless heroine dressed in the shabbiest of clothes, appears in the midst of a gay and giddy throng; she apostrophises all and sundry there, including the villain, and has a magnificent scene which always brings down the house, and nightly adds to her histrionic laurels.
    • 1995, Pitts, Mary Ellen, Toward a Dialogue of Understandings: Loren Eiseley and the Critique of Science, page 225:
      At dawn, in the midst of a mist that is both literal and the unformed shifting of thought, he encounters a young fox pup playfully shaking a bone.
    • 2002, Schlueter, Nathan W., quoting Martin Luther King, Jr., I Have a Dream, 1963, speech, quoted in One Dream Or Two?: Justice in America and in the Thought of Martin Luther King, Jr., page 89:
      As he said in "I Have a Dream," the Negro "lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity."

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PrepositionEdit

midst

  1. (rare) Among, in the middle of; amid.

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ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ middes, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

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