monstrous

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English monstrous, from Old French monstrueuse, monstrüos, from Latin mōnstrōsus. Compare monstruous.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

monstrous (comparative more monstrous, superlative most monstrous)

  1. Hideous or frightful.
  2. Enormously large.
    a monstrous height
    a monstrous ox
  3. Freakish or grotesque.
    • (Can we date this quote by John Locke and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      a monstrous birth
    • (Can we date this quote by Jeremy Taylor and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      He, therefore, that refuses to do good to them whom he is bound to love [] is unnatural and monstrous in his affections.
  4. Of, or relating to a mythical monster; full of monsters.
    • (Can we date this quote by John Milton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Where thou, perhaps, under the whelming tide / Visitest the bottom of the monstrous world.
  5. (obsolete) Marvellous; strange.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

monstrous

  1. Alternative form of monstruous