nig-nog

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Cant. Crew : Nigmenog; a very silly Fellow.[1]

NounEdit

nig-nog ‎(plural nig-nogs)

  1. (contemptuous, good humored, non-racial, slang) A foolish person; hence, a raw and unskilled recruit. Cf. ning-nong.
    • 1953, Punch 9 Dec. 692/3
      All must be represented on a strict basis of proportion of the number of citizens for whom they cater: Football-pool promoters (six representatives), barrow-boys (two representatives), share-pushers, erks, nig-nogs, [etc.].
      1962 A. Wesker, Chips with Everything i. iii. 17
      A straight line, you heaving nig-nogs, a straight line.
      1967 Times, 30 Nov. 10/8
      ‘Nig-nog’ was used on the railways and elsewhere long before coloured immigrants appeared... It is usually taken as a mildly contemptuous but good-humoured name for an unskilled man or novice.

Etymology 2Edit

This term became used as a reduplicative from nigger that became a part of the the slang lexicon of people from Maine, USA and elsewhere around America around the middle of the 20th century. It is also be applied to any persons of color including individuals from the Middle East, however this inclusion is largely exclusive to the UK.

NounEdit

nig-nog ‎(plural nig-nogs)

  1. (slang, offensive, ethnic slur) A person of color, especially, a black person.
    • 1977, Barbara Tizard, Adoption: A Second Chance
      He'll need this in a white community – He gets "Sambo" and "Nig-nog" at school already – if he's proud of himself it will be easier for him in the long run.
    • 2002, Vron Ware, Les Back, Out of Whiteness: Color, Politics, and Culture
      We didn't touch their area before but we ran through Brixton and you couldn't see a nig-nog on the street. Any nig-nog walked on the street was dead.
    • 2005, Amitav Ghosh, The Shadow Lines
      But when she turned the corner near the park, keeping her head down so that nobody would notice her, she heard someone shout: Little wog, nig-nog!

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, a 1700 B. E. Dict.
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