See also: münt

English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /mʌnt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌnt

Etymology 1 edit

Probably derived from Northern Ndebele umuntu, with stress on the first syllable, which is uncommon for Nguni languages.

Noun edit

munt (plural munts)

  1. (Rhodesia, slang, originally military, derogatory, offensive, ethnic slur) A black person, usually a man.
    • 1964 [1957], Colin MacInnes, City of Spades, London: Penguin Books, page 22:
      My Dad has taught me that in England some foolish man may call me sambo, darkie, boot or munt or nigger, even.
    • 2006, Geoffrey Nyarota, Against the Grain: Memoirs of a Zimbabwean Newsman, Zebra Press, page 63:
      Munt was a derogatory term used by the [Rhodesian] security forces to refer to blacks.

Etymology 2 edit

Related to munted; see there for more.

Verb edit

munt (third-person singular simple present munts, present participle munting, simple past and past participle munted)

  1. (Australia, slang) To vomit (usually while drunk).
  2. (slang) the act of munting.

Etymology 3 edit

Blend of man +‎ cunt

Noun edit

munt (plural munts)

  1. (slang) mangina

Noun edit

munt (plural munts)

  1. (New Zealand, slang, used by schoolchildren) Something or someone dumb or annoying.

Afrikaans edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

munt (plural munte, diminutive muntjie)

  1. coin
  2. mint

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin mōntem.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

munt m (plural munts)

  1. (also figurative) heap
    un munt de…a heap (of things)
    N'hi ha un muntthere is a lot (of it)
  2. (archaic or toponyms) Synonym of muntanya

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Dutch munte, from Old Dutch munita, from late Proto-West Germanic *munit (coin).

Noun edit

munt f (plural munten, diminutive muntje n)

  1. coin
    Synonym: muntstuk
  2. currency
    Synonym: munteenheid
  3. tails (side of a coin)
    Antonyms: kop, kruis
  4. mint (institution)
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Negerhollands: mynt

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle Dutch mente, minte, from Latin mentha.

Noun edit

munt f (plural munten, diminutive muntje n)

  1. mint (plant), of genus Mentha
  2. (chiefly diminutive) confection flavored with mint
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Indonesian: min

Etymology 3 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

munt

  1. inflection of munten:
    1. first/second/third-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

munt

  1. Alternative form of mount

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

munt

  1. Alternative form of mounten

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

munt

  1. Alternative form of mynt (strike)

Old Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *munþ.

Noun edit

munt m

  1. mouth

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

  • munt”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin mōns, montem.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

munt m

  1. a hill, mound
  2. a mount or mountain
    • "Gospel of Saint Luke", chapter 4, verse 29
      And hiġ ārīson and scūfon hine of ðǣre ceastre. And lǣddon hine ofer ðæs muntes cnæpp. Ofer þone hyra buruh ġetimbrud wæs. þ hī hyne nyðer bescūfon.
      And they arose and shoved him from the city. And led him over the mount's top. Over that their city was built. That they thrusted him downward.

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Old French edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin mōns.

Noun edit

munt oblique singularm (oblique plural munz or muntz, nominative singular munz or muntz, nominative plural munt)

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of mont (mountain)

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin mundus.

Noun edit

munt oblique singularm (oblique plural munz or muntz, nominative singular munz or muntz, nominative plural munt)

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of monde (world)