See also: Nitrogen and nitrogén

English edit

Chemical element
N
Previous: carbon (C)
Next: oxygen (O)

Etymology edit

From French nitrogène (coined by Jean-Antoine Chaptal), corresponding to nitro- +‎ -gen. See niter.

Pronunciation edit

  • (US) enPR: nī′trəjən, IPA(key): /ˈnaɪ.tɹə.d͡ʒən/, [ˈnɐɪtʰɹəd͡ʒən]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ni‧tro‧gen

Noun edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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nitrogen (countable and uncountable, plural nitrogens)

  1. (uncountable) The chemical element (symbol N) with an atomic number of 7 and atomic weight of 14.0067. It is a colorless and odorless gas.
    • 2006, Michael Pollan, The Omnivore's Dilemma, The Penguin Press, →ISBN, page 42:
      All life depends on nitrogen; it is the building block from which nature assembles amino acids, proteins, and nucleic acids; the genetic information that orders and perpetuates life is written in nitrogen ink.
  2. (uncountable) Molecular nitrogen (N2), a colorless, odorless gas at room temperature.
    • 1997, A. J. Taylor, D. S. Mothram, editors, Flavour Science: Recent Developments[1], Elsevier, →ISBN, page 63:
      Volatiles of kecap manis and its raw materials were extracted using Likens-Nickerson apparatus with diethyl ether as the extraction solvent. The extracts were then dried with anhydrous sodium sulfate, concentrated using a rotary evaporator followed by flushing using nitrogen until the volume was about 0.5 ml.
  3. (countable) A specific nitrogen atom within a chemical formula, or a specific isotope of nitrogen
    The two nitrogens are located next to one another on the ring.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Chemical element
N
Previous: carboni (C)
Next: oxigen (O)

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French nitrogène.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nitrogen m (uncountable)

  1. nitrogen
    Synonym: azot

Further reading edit

Danish edit

Noun edit

nitrogen ?

  1. nitrogen
    Synonym: kvælstof

Malay edit

 
Malay Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ms
Chemical element
N
Previous: karbon (C)
Next: oksigen (O)

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From English nitrogen, from French nitrogène.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nitrogen (Jawi spellingنيتروݢن⁩)

  1. nitrogen (chemical element)
    Synonym: zat lemas / ذات لمس

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Noun edit

nitrogen n (definite singular nitrogenet, indefinite plural nitrogen, definite plural nitrogena or nitrogenene)

  1. nitrogen (chemical element; symbol N).

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Noun edit

nitrogen n (definite singular nitrogenet) (uncountable)

  1. nitrogen (chemical element; symbol N).

Derived terms edit

References edit

Romanian edit

 
Romanian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ro
Chemical element
N
Previous: carbon (C)
Next: oxigen (O)

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French nitrogène.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˌnitroˈd͡ʒen/
  • Hyphenation: ni‧tro‧gen

Noun edit

nitrogen n (uncountable)

  1. nitrogen (chemical element)
    Synonym: azot

Declension edit

References edit

Welsh edit

Chemical element
N
Previous: carbon (C)
Next: ocsigen (O)
 
Welsh Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cy

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English nitrogen, from French nitrogène, from French nitre, from Latin nitrum (niter, natron), from Ancient Greek νίτρον (nítron), ultimately from Egyptian nṯrj (natron).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nitrogen m (uncountable, not mutable)

  1. nitrogen
    Synonyms: blawrbar, blorai, blornwy, trengnwy

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “nitrogen”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies