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LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Found in Late Latin. Perhaps from children's speech dating back to a late Proto-Indo-European *nana-. See also Ancient Greek νόννος (nónnos, father), νέννος (nénnos, uncle), νάννας (nánnas, uncle), νίννη (nínnē, aunt), and Proto-Celtic *nana (grandmother).

NounEdit

nonnus m (genitive nonnī); second declension

  1. monk
  2. tutor
  3. old person

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative nonnus nonnī
genitive nonnī nonnōrum
dative nonnō nonnīs
accusative nonnum nonnōs
ablative nonnō nonnīs
vocative nonne nonnī

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • nonnus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “nonnus”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • nonnus” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • nonnus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • nonnus in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray