nun

See also: Nun, Nun., nún, and ñun

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English nunne ("nun, priestess") Late Latin, from nonna ‎(nun, tutor), originally (along with masculine form nonnus ‎(man)) a term of address for elderly persons, perhaps from children's speech, reminiscent of nana, like papa etc.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nun ‎(plural nuns)

  1. A member of a Christian religious community of women who live by certain vows and usually wear a habit, in some cases living together in a cloister.
  2. By extension, member of a similar female community in other confessions.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2Edit

Ultimately from Proto-Semitic *nūn- ‎(fish).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nun ‎(plural nuns)

  1. The fourteenth letter of many Semitic alphabets/abjads (Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew, Syriac, Arabic and others).
TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • nun” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

AsturianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin nōn.

AdverbEdit

nun

  1. not, no (used to make negatives)

Etymology 2Edit

ContractionEdit

nun

  1. in a/an (contraction of en + un)

ChiricahuaEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • non (in older Americanist literature)

EtymologyEdit

Cognates: Navajo nooʼ, Western Apache non, noi, Plains Apache nǫǫ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nun

  1. grave, burial place
  2. cache

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

German nun.

AdverbEdit

nun

  1. now

Derived termsEdit


FalaEdit

AdverbEdit

nun

  1. Alternative form of non

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From contraction of preposition en ‎(in) + masculine article un ‎(a, one)

ContractionEdit

nun m ‎(feminine nunha, masculine plural nuns, feminine plural nunhas)

  1. in a, in one

GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • nu (colloquial; otherwise archaic)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German nu, nū, nuo with a secondary final -n, already occasionally in Middle High German nuon.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

nun

  1. now, then; expressing a logical or temporal consequence
    Wir haben abgewaschen, nun müssen wir noch abtrocknen.
    We've washed up, now we must dry [the dishes].
    Was bedeuten nun die geschilderten Entwicklungen für unser Land?
    Now what do the aforementioned developments mean for our country?
  2. unstressed and expletive, used for minor emphasis
    Was soll das nun heißen?
    What's that supposed to mean now?

Usage notesEdit

  • Although the adverb is similar and akin to English "now", German nun is not commonly used in a strictly temporal sense, meaning "at this very moment". For that, see jetzt.

InterjectionEdit

nun

  1. now, well, so
    Nun, das ist eine schwierige Frage.
    Well, that's a tough question.

HausaEdit

NounEdit

nun f

  1. Arabic letter nun (ن)

IdoEdit

AdverbEdit

nun

  1. now

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

nun

  1. rafsi of nu.

MirandeseEdit

AdverbEdit

nun

  1. not

NovialEdit

AdverbEdit

nun

  1. now


Old FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See nom.

NounEdit

nun m ‎(oblique plural nuns, nominative singular nuns, nominative plural nun)

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of nom

Etymology 2Edit

Reduced from of negun.

AdjectiveEdit

nun

  1. Alternative form of negun

PronounEdit

nun

  1. Alternative form of negun

RohingyaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Bengali.

NounEdit

nun

  1. salt

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin nonnus.

NounEdit

nun m ‎(plural nuni, feminine equivalent nună)

  1. the godfather at a wedding

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic نُون ‎(nūn).

NounEdit

nun

  1. Letter of the Arabic alphabet: ن
    • Previous: م
    • Next: و

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

nun ‎(plural nuns)

  1. message

DeclensionEdit

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