See also: Nonne

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From late Old Norse nunna, from Late Latin nonna.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /nɔnə/, [ˈnʌnə]

NounEdit

nonne c (singular definite nonnen, plural indefinite nonner)

  1. nun (member of a religious community of women)
  2. nun moth, black-arched moth (Lymantria monacha)

InflectionEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French none, nominative singular of nonain, from Late Latin nonna. Compare German Nonne.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nonne f (plural nonnes)

  1. (literary) nun
    Synonym: religieuse

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

nonne f

  1. plural of nonna

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From nōn (not) +‎ -ne (interrogative particle).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

nōnne (not comparable)

  1. (in a direct question) not, expecting an affirmative answer
    Non sum liber? non sum apostolus? nonne Iesum Dominum nostrum vidi?
    Am I not free? am I not an apostle? have I not seen Jesus Christ our Lord? (I Corinthians 9:1)
    Nonne intellegis?
    You do understand, don't you?
    Quid? Nonne sustulisti?
    What? Haven't you (sg.) suffered?
    Te dejectum debeo intellegere, etiamsi tactus non fueris: nonne
    I ought to recognize you in this downcast state, even without touching you, oughtn't I?
    Quid paulo ante dixerim, nonne meministi?
    What I just said, don't you remember it?
  2. (in an indirect interrogation) if not, whether not
    Cum esset ex eo quaesitum, Archelaum Perdiccae filium nonne beatum putaret.
    When it should be asked of him whether he didn't consider Archelaus, son of Perdiccas, to be blessed.
    Quaero a te, nonne putes?
    I ask of you: don't you think so?

Usage notesEdit

  • In a direct interrogation:
    Nonne ego hic sto?
    Don't I stand here?
    Nonne animadvertis?
    Aren't you paying attention?
  • Nonne is very rarely repeated:
    Nonne extremam pati fortunam paratos projecit ille? nonne sibi clam ...?
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
  • It is usually followed by non in continued questions:
    Nonne vobis haec quae audīstis oculis cernere videmini? non illum ... videtis? non positas insidias? non, etc.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

ReferencesEdit

  • nonne in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • nonne in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • nonne in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • is it not so: nonne?

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English nunne, from Late Latin nonna.

NounEdit

nonne (plural nonnes)

  1. nun

DescendantsEdit

  • English: nun
  • Scots: nun

Middle FrenchEdit

NounEdit

nonne f (plural nonnes)

  1. noon; midday

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French none, nonain, from Late Latin nonna.

NounEdit

nonne f (plural nonnes)

  1. (Jersey) nun

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse nunna and Late Latin nonna

NounEdit

nonne f or m (definite singular nonna or nonnen, indefinite plural nonner, definite plural nonnene)

  1. a nun

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse nunna and Late Latin nonna

NounEdit

nonne f (definite singular nonna, indefinite plural nonner, definite plural nonnene)

  1. a nun

ReferencesEdit