EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English nōhwæþer. Compare neither, nauther.

PronounEdit

nother

  1. (obsolete outside Britain and Caribbean dialects) Neither.

AdjectiveEdit

nother (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete outside Britain and Caribbean dialects) Neither.

Etymology 2Edit

Variant of an other, another, influenced by re-analysis as a nother.

PronounEdit

nother

  1. (obsolete) Another.

AdjectiveEdit

nother (not comparable)

  1. (largely obsolete outside the US phrase a whole nother) Different, other.
    • 2009 October 1, Automotive Editors, “Long-Term Test Cars”, in Poplar Mechanics[1], retrieved 2012-03-14:
      Executing it all well, with the feel, look and operation of a real luxury car, is a whole nother ball of wax.
    • 2015, LT Wolf, The World King (fiction), →ISBN:
      He has said elfsheen four nother ways — elfsheen, elfshine, elfshone, elfshyne.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

AdverbEdit

nother

  1. nor
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Eugène Vinaver, editor, Le Morte d'Arthur[2], 1947, book XVIII:
      Than the quene seyde, ‘Syr, as Jesu be my helpe!’ She wyst nat how, nother in what manere.
      Then the Queen said, ‘Sir, for Jesus help me!’ She knew not how, nor in what manner.
    • a. 1472, Thomas Malory, “Capitulum ii”, in [Le Morte Darthur], book VII, [London: [] by William Caxton], published 31 July 1485, OCLC 71490786; republished as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, Le Morte Darthur [], London: Published by David Nutt, [], 1889, OCLC 890162034, page 214:
      Syre he ſayd / ther of be as it be may I haue aſked that I wylle aſke / wel ſayd the kynge ye ſhal have mete & drynke ynouȝ / I neuer deffended ƿt none / nother my frende ne my foo
      Sire, he said, that is it; I have asked what I would ask. Well, said the king, you shall have meat and drink enough. I never took vengence with any, neither my friend nor my foe.