Open main menu
See also: Throne

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English trone, from Old French trone, from Latin thronus, from Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos, chair, throne).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

throne (plural thrones)

  1. An impressive seat used by a monarch, often on a raised dais in a throne room and reserved for formal occasions.
    He approached the throne reverently.
  2. The seat of a bishop in the cathedral-church of his diocese.
  3. (humorous) Other seats, particularly:
    1. (euphemistic) A seat used for urination or defecation, such as a chamber pot, toilet, or the seat of an outhouse.
      She's on the throne.
    2. (music) A kind of stool used by drummers.
  4. (figuratively) Leadership, particularly the position of a monarch.
    Elizabeth has sat upon the throne of England for six decades.
  5. (Christianity) A member of an order of angels ranked above dominions and below cherubim.

SynonymsEdit

HypernymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

throne (third-person singular simple present thrones, present participle throning, simple past and past participle throned)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To place on a royal seat; to enthrone.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To place in an elevated position; to give sovereignty or dominion to; to exalt.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Milton
      True image of the Father, whether throned / In the bosom of bliss, and light of light.
  3. (intransitive, archaic) To be in, or sit upon, a throne; to be placed as if upon a throne.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

VerbEdit

throne

  1. First-person singular present of thronen.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of thronen.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of thronen.
  4. Imperative singular of thronen.

LatinEdit

NounEdit

throne

  1. vocative singular of thronus

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

throne

  1. Alternative form of trone (throne)

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French trone, from Latin thronus, from Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos). The h was added back to reflect the Latin thronus, from Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos, chair, throne).

NounEdit

throne m (plural thrones)

  1. throne

DescendantsEdit