EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin optatus, past participle of optare.

VerbEdit

optate (third-person singular simple present optates, present participle optating, simple past and past participle optated)

  1. (obsolete) To choose; to wish for; to desire.
    • 1989, François Rabelais, “An Epistle by Pantagruel's Limosin”, in The Complete Works of Doctor François Rabelais:
      While we, alas! must still obambulate, Sequacious of the court and courtier's fate : O most infaust who optates there to live! An aulic life no solid joys can give.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cotgrave to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for optate in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

optate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of optare
  2. second-person plural imperative of optare
  3. feminine plural of optato

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

optāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of optātus