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EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ourn, ouren, from Old English ūrne and similar forms. Compare mine, thine; also compare and see hern. Displaced in standard speech by the -s form, ours, which see for more.

PronounEdit

ourn

  1. (obsolete outside Britain and US dialectal, especially Appalachia) Ours.
    • 1914, Edgar Rice Burrows, The Mucker[1], HTML edition, The Gutenberg Project, published 2009:
      "Supposin'," continued Ward, "that we let two o' your men an' two o' ourn under Mr. Divine, shin up them cliffs ..."

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Middle EnglishEdit

PronounEdit

ourn

  1. Alternative form of ouren.

ReferencesEdit