English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English oures, attested since the 1300s. Equivalent to our +‎ -s (compare -'s); formed by analogy to his. Displaced ourn (from Middle English ouren) in standard speech.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

ours

  1. That which belongs to us; the possessive case of we, used without a following noun.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

References edit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2024), “ours”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French ours, from Old French urs, from Latin ursus.

The Early Modern French pronunciation was /uʁ/ before consonants, /uʁz/ before vowels, and /uʁs/ in pausa. For the most part, the pausal pronunciations were eventually lost, but in some cases they were re-established as the basic form (reinforced in part by the spelling, in part by related words; in this case perhaps the feminine ourse).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ours m (plural ours, feminine ourse)

  1. bear (animal)
  2. (figurative) A person like a bear:
    1. loner, someone who avoids company [since 1671]
      faire l’oursto be a loner
    2. beast, beastly person [since 1820]
    3. (gay slang) bear (hairy gay man)
    4. (obsolete) pressman, worker with a hand printing press [1700s—1800s]
  3. masthead, imprint (list of a publication's main staff)
  4. (cinematography) rough cut
  5. (slang) prison, jail

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Haitian Creole: ous
  • Louisiana Creole: lours, lous
  • Mauritian Creole: lurs
  • Seychellois Creole: lours

Further reading edit

Middle English edit

Pronoun edit

ours

  1. Alternative form of oures

Middle French edit

Etymology edit

From Old French urs, from Latin ursus.

Noun edit

ours m (plural ours, feminine singular ourse, feminine plural ourses)

  1. bear (mammal)

Descendants edit