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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English oures, attested since the 1300s. Equivalent to our +‎ -s (compare -'s); formed by analogy to his. Displaced ourn (from Middle English ouren) in standard speech.[1]

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ours

  1. That which belongs to us; the possessive case of we, used without a following noun.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ ours” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French ours, from Old French urs, from Latin ursus, from Proto-Italic *orssos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ŕ̥tḱos (bear).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ours m (plural ours, feminine ourse)

  1. bear (animal)
  2. masthead (list of a newspaper's main staff)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Haitian Creole: ous
  • Louisiana Creole French: lours, lous
  • Mauritian Creole: lurs
  • Seychellois Creole: lours

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

PronounEdit

ours

  1. Alternative form of oures

ReferencesEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French urs, from Latin ursus.

NounEdit

ours m (plural ours, feminine singular ourse, feminine plural ourses)

  1. bear (mammal)

DescendantsEdit