See also: Mine, miné, minè, minę, míně, and -mine

English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • enPR: mīn, IPA(key): /maɪ̯n/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪn

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English min, myn, from Old English mīn, from Proto-West Germanic *mīn, from Proto-Germanic *mīnaz, from Proto-Indo-European *méynos.

Cognate with Saterland Frisian mien, West Frisian myn, Dutch mijn, Low German mien, German mein, Danish, Swedish and Norwegian min, Icelandic mín.

Alternative forms edit

Pronoun edit

mine

  1. That which belongs to me.
    1. Used predicatively.
      The house itself is mine, but the land is not.
    2. Used substantively, with an implied noun.
      Mine has been a long journey.
    3. Used absolutely, set off from the sentence.
      Mine for only a week so far, it already feels like an old friend.
    4. Used otherwise not directly before the possessed noun. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
      This house of mine is over 100 years old.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
See also edit

Determiner edit

mine

  1. My; belonging to me.
    1. (archaic) Used attributively after the noun it modifies.
    2. (archaic) Used attributively before a vowel.
      • 1862 February, Julia Ward Howe, “The Battle Hymn of the Republic”, in The Atlantic Monthly, volume IX, number LII, page 10:
        Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord: / []
      • 1930 Winter, Packard Motor Car Company, The Packard Magazine, Volume 9, Number 2, page 6,
        Mine host, it seemed, did favors for everybody...
Usage notes edit
  • My and mine are essentially two forms of the same word, with my being used attributively before the noun, and mine being used in all other cases, as may be seen in most of the usage examples and quotations above. In this respect, this word is analogous to most of the other possessive pronouns (e.g. your vs. yours), as well as a number of other noun modifiers, such as lone/alone.
  • Historically, my came to be used only before a consonant sound, and later came to be used regardless of the following sound. Nonetheless, mine still sees archaic pre-vocalic use, as may be seen in the 1862 quotation above, and in the most formal of writing even into the 20th century.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English, from Old French mine, from Late Latin mina, from Gaulish (compare to Welsh mwyn, Irish mianach (ore)), from Proto-Celtic *mēnis (ore, metal).

Noun edit

mine (plural mines)

 
Entrance to a gold mine in Victoria, Australia
 
Cutaway view of an anti-tank landmine
  1. An excavation from which ore or solid minerals are taken, especially one consisting of underground tunnels.
    This diamond comes from a mine in South Africa.
    He came out of the coal mine with a face covered in black.
    Most coal and ore comes from open-pit mines nowadays.
  2. (figurative) Any source of wealth or resources.
    She's a mine of information.
    • 1962 December, “Beyond the Channel: U.S.S.R.: Train speeds still rising”, in Modern Railways, page 418:
      To those seeking information about train services on the Continent, Cook's Continental Guide is always a mine of accurate information.
  3. (military) A passage dug toward or underneath enemy lines, which is then packed with explosives.
  4. (military) A device intended to explode when stepped upon or touched, or when approached by a ship, vehicle, or person.
    His left leg was blown off after he stepped on a mine.
    The warship was destroyed by floating mines.
    • 1940 May, “Overseas Railways: Icebound Denmark”, in Railway Magazine, page 302:
      Pack ice, at times mounting to a height of 35 ft., snow, fog, and floating mines all played their part in the disorganisation of railway services, and most of the train ferry services were completely suspended for a month or more; [...].
  5. (pyrotechnics) A type of firework that explodes on the ground, shooting sparks upward.
  6. (entomology) The cavity made by a caterpillar while feeding inside a leaf.
  7. (computing) A machine or network of machines used to extract units of a cryptocurrency.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

mine (third-person singular simple present mines, present participle mining, simple past and past participle mined)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To remove (rock or ore) from the ground.
    Crater of Diamonds State Park is the only place in the world where visitors can mine their own diamonds.
  2. To dig into, for ore or metal.
    • 1837, Andrew Ure, Dictionary of Arts, Manufactures and Mines:
      Lead veins have been traced [] but they have not been mined.
  3. (transitive) To sow mines (the explosive devices) in (an area).
    We had to slow our advance after the enemy mined the road ahead of us.
  4. (transitive) To damage (a vehicle or ship) with a mine (an explosive device).
  5. (intransitive) To dig a tunnel or hole; to burrow in the earth.
    the mining cony
  6. To dig away, or otherwise remove, the substratum or foundation of; to lay a mine under; to sap; to undermine.
  7. (by extension, figurative) To ruin or destroy by slow degrees or secret means.
  8. (slang) To pick one's nose.
  9. (cryptocurrencies) To earn new units of cryptocurrency by doing certain calculations.
    Coordinate term: mint
    • 2021 March 9, Andrew Ross Sorkin, “Bitcoin's Climate Problem”, in The New York Times[1], →ISSN:
      Bitcoin supporters say that estimates of its carbon footprint are overstated. And if the computers that mine and help transact bitcoins are attached to an electric grid that uses wind and solar power, they add, mining and using it will become cleaner over time.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 3 edit

Borrowed from French mine.

Noun edit

mine (plural mines)

  1. Alternative form of mien

Anagrams edit

Aromanian edit

Pronoun edit

mine

  1. Alternative form of mini

Crimean Gothic edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *mēnô.

Noun edit

mine

  1. moon
    • 1562, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq:
      Mine. Luna.

Czech edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

mine

  1. third-person singular future indicative of minout

Danish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /miːnə/, [ˈmiːnə], [ˈmiːn̩]

Noun edit

mine c (singular definite minen, plural indefinite miner)

  1. look, air, mien
  2. (military) mine
  3. pit

Inflection edit

Pronoun edit

mine

  1. (possessive) plural of min

See also edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Vulgar Latin *mina, Gaulish *meina (see also Welsh mwyn, Irish míanach (ore)), from Proto-Celtic *mēnis (ore, metal).

Noun edit

mine f (plural mines)

  1. mine (excavation or explosive)
  2. pencil lead
  3. (soccer) piledriver, scorcher
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Breton min (beak, muzzle) (from Proto-Celtic *mēnis, in the sense of "red"),[1] or from Italian mina, from Latin miniō (to redden).[2]

Noun edit

mine f (plural mines)

  1. appearance, physical aspect; expression
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

From miner.

Verb edit

mine

  1. inflection of miner:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading edit

References edit

  1. ^ Rea, J. & Rea, C. B. (1973): Circa instans, p. 401
  2. ^ Le Robert pour tous, Dictionnaire de la langue française, Janvier 2004, p. 727, mine1

Anagrams edit

Irish edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

mine

  1. inflection of mion:
    1. genitive feminine singular
    2. comparative degree

Noun edit

mine f

  1. genitive singular of min

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mine mhine not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian edit

Noun edit

mine f

  1. plural of mina

Anagrams edit

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

mine

  1. Rōmaji transcription of みね

Middle Dutch edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Old French mine.

Noun edit

mine f

  1. ore vein, mine
Inflection edit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants edit
  • Dutch: mijn
  • Limburgish: mien

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Determiner edit

mine

  1. inflection of mijn:
    1. feminine nominative/accusative singular
    2. nominative/accusative plural

Further reading edit

Middle English edit

Determiner edit

mine (subjective pronoun I)

  1. Alternative form of min

Pronoun edit

mine (subjective I)

  1. Alternative form of min

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology edit

From Old Norse mínir, or from Old French mine.

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun edit

mine f or m (definite singular mina or minen, indefinite plural miner, definite plural minene)

  1. a mine (excavation or explosive)

Derived terms edit

Determiner edit

mine

  1. plural of min

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse mínir, or from Old French mine.

Noun edit

mine f (definite singular mina, indefinite plural miner, definite plural minene)

  1. a mine (excavation or explosive)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

mine (present tense minar/miner, past tense mina/minte, past participle mina/mint, passive infinitive minast, present participle minande, imperative mine/min)

  1. Alternative form of mina

Etymology 3 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Determiner edit

mine

  1. plural of min

References edit

Phuthi edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Nguni *miná.

Pronoun edit

miné

  1. I, me; first-person singular absolute pronoun.

Portuguese edit

Verb edit

mine

  1. inflection of minar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Romanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Latin , possibly through a Vulgar Latin root *mēne, or through analogy with cine, from *quene, from quem. It also possibly acquired this ending through adopting the common Latin accusative inflection -inem. Compare tine, sine. Compare also Aromanian mini, Dalmatian main, Neapolitan mene.

Pronoun edit

mine (stressed accusative form of eu)

  1. (direct object, preceded by preposition, such as "pe", "cu", "la", or "pentru") me
    iubești pe mine?Do you love me?
Related terms edit
  • (unstressed form)
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

mine

  1. plural of mină

Scots edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

mine

  1. mine

Scottish Gaelic edit

Noun edit

mine f

  1. genitive singular of min

Mutation edit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
mine mhine
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Sidamo edit

 
Mine (1).

Etymology edit

From Proto-Cushitic *min- (house, to build). Cognates include Oromo mana, Burji mina and Hadiyya mine.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmine/
  • Hyphenation: mi‧ne

Noun edit

mine m (plural minna f)

  1. house
  2. household

References edit

  • Kazuhiro Kawachi (2007) A grammar of Sidaama (Sidamo), a Cushitic language of Ethiopia, page 62
  • Gizaw Shimelis, editor (2007), “mine”, in Sidaama-Amharic-English dictionary, Addis Ababa: Sidama Information and Culture department

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmine/ [ˈmi.ne]
  • Rhymes: -ine
  • Syllabification: mi‧ne

Verb edit

mine

  1. inflection of minar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Swazi edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Nguni *miná.

Pronoun edit

miné

  1. I, me; first-person singular absolute pronoun.