outmaster

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

out- +‎ master

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

outmaster (third-person singular simple present outmasters, present participle outmastering, simple past and past participle outmastered)

  1. To overcome; to win or prevail in a competition.
    • 1835, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The poetical works of S.T. Coleridge - Volume 2, page 81:
      Pleas'd with the guilt, yet envy-stung at heart To stand outmaster'd in his own black art!
    • 1894, Henry Scott Holland, God's City and the Coming of the Kingdom, page 151:
      He would outmaster, outflank, the mystery of iniquity by the mystery of godliness.
    • 2000, Catherine Coulter, Jade Star, →ISBN, page 204:
      Don't try to outmaster the master.
    • 2015, Jenni James, The Little Mermaid: Faerie Tale Collection, →ISBN:
      The great, hulking brute rubbed his jaw and lunged at Keel, but years of the finest royal training only made it easy for the angry merprince to outmaster the human.

AnagramsEdit