See also: Master, máster, màster, and Mäster

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English maister, mayster, meister, from Old English mǣster, mæġster, mæġester, mæġister, magister (master), from Latin magister (chief, teacher, leader), from Old Latin magester, from Proto-Indo-European *méǵh₂s, (as in magnus (great)) + -ester/-ister (compare minister (servant)). Reinforced by Old French maistre, mestre from the same Latin source. Compare also Saterland Frisian Mäster (master), West Frisian master (master), Dutch meester (master), German Meister (master). Doublet of maestro and magister.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

master (plural masters, feminine mistress)

  1. Someone who has control over something or someone.
  2. The owner of an animal or slave.
  3. (nautical) The captain of a merchant ship; a master mariner.
    Synonyms: skipper, captain
  4. (dated) The head of a household.
  5. Someone who employs others.
  6. An expert at something.
    Mark Twain was a master of fiction.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:skilled person
    • 1843 July, [Thomas Babington Macaulay], “Art. VII—The Life of Joseph Addison. By Lucy Aikin.”, in The Edinburgh Review, number CLVII, page 231:
      But that which chiefly distinguishes Addison from Swift, from Voltaire, from almost all the other great masters of ridicule, is the grace, the nobleness, the moral purity, which we find even in his merriment.
    • 1693, [John Locke], “§189”, in Some Thoughts Concerning Education, London: [] A[wnsham] and J[ohn] Churchill, [], OCLC 1161614482:
      No care is taken to improve young men in their own language, that they may thoroughly understand and be masters of it.
  7. A tradesman who is qualified to teach apprentices.
  8. (dated) A schoolmaster.
  9. A skilled artist.
  10. (dated) A man or a boy; mister. See Master.
  11. A master's degree; a type of postgraduate degree, usually undertaken after a bachelor degree.
    She has a master in psychology.
    Synonyms: masters, master's, (Quebec English) magistrate
  12. A person holding such a degree.
    He is a master of marine biology.
  13. The original of a document or of a recording.
    The band couldn't find the master, so they re-recorded their tracks.
  14. (film) The primary wide shot of a scene, into which the closeups will be edited later.
    Synonyms: establishing shot, long shot
  15. (law) A parajudicial officer (such as a referee, an auditor, an examiner, or an assessor) specially appointed to help a court with its proceedings.
    The case was tried by a master, who concluded that the plaintiffs were the equitable owners of the property. []
  16. (engineering, computing) A device that is controlling other devices or is an authoritative source.
    a master wheel
    a master database
    Synonym: primary
    Antonyms: secondary, slave
  17. (freemasonry) A person holding an office of authority, especially the presiding officer.
  18. (by extension) A person holding a similar office in other civic societies.
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Pages starting with “master”.

DescendantsEdit
  • Sranan Tongo: masra
  • Catalan: màster
  • Finnish: master
  • French: master
  • German: Master
  • Polish: master
  • Portuguese: máster
  • Spanish: máster
  • Turkish: master
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See alsoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

master (not comparable)

  1. Masterful.
    a master performance
  2. Main, principal or predominant.
  3. Highly skilled.
    master batsman
  4. Original.
    master copy
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

master (third-person singular simple present masters, present participle mastering, simple past and past participle mastered)

  1. (intransitive) To be a master.
  2. (transitive) To become the master of; to subject to one's will, control, or authority; to conquer; to overpower; to subdue.
    • 1693, [John Locke], “(please specify the section number)”, in Some Thoughts Concerning Education, London: [] A[wnsham] and J[ohn] Churchill, [], OCLC 1161614482:
      Obstinacy and willful neglects must be mastered, even though it cost blows.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      Then Elzevir cried out angrily, 'Silence. Are you mad, or has the liquor mastered you? Are you Revenue-men that you dare shout and roister? or contrabandiers with the lugger in the offing, and your life in your hand. You make noise enough to wake folk in Moonfleet from their beds.'
  3. (transitive) To learn to a high degree of proficiency.
    It took her years to master the art of needlecraft.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To own; to possess.
  5. (transitive, especially of a musical performance) To make a master copy of.
  6. (intransitive, usually with in) To earn a Master's degree.
    He mastered in English at the state college.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

mast +‎ -er

NounEdit

master (plural masters)

  1. (nautical, in combination) A vessel having a specified number of masts.
    a two-master
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

master

  1. (BDSM) (male) dom

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of master (Kotus type 6/paperi, no gradation)
nominative master masterit
genitive masterin masterien
mastereiden
mastereitten
partitive masteria mastereita
mastereja
illative masteriin mastereihin
singular plural
nominative master masterit
accusative nom. master masterit
gen. masterin
genitive masterin masterien
mastereiden
mastereitten
partitive masteria mastereita
mastereja
inessive masterissa mastereissa
elative masterista mastereista
illative masteriin mastereihin
adessive masterilla mastereilla
ablative masterilta mastereilta
allative masterille mastereille
essive masterina mastereina
translative masteriksi mastereiksi
instructive masterein
abessive masteritta mastereitta
comitative mastereineen
Possessive forms of master (type paperi)
possessor singular plural
1st person masterini masterimme
2nd person masterisi masterinne
3rd person masterinsa

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English master. Doublet of maître, inherited from Latin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

master m (plural masters)

  1. master's degree, master's (postgraduate degree)
  2. master (golf tournament)
  3. master, master copy

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch master, from English master, from Middle English maister, mayster, meister, from Old English mǣster, mæġster, mæġester, mæġister, magister (master), from Latin magister (chief, teacher, leader), from Old Latin magester, from Proto-Indo-European *méǵh₂s, (as in magnus (great)) + -ester/-ister (compare minister (servant)). Doublet of magister and mester.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmast̪ər]
  • Hyphenation: mas‧têr

NounEdit

master (plural master-master, first-person possessive masterku, second-person possessive mastermu, third-person possessive masternya)

  1. master:
    1. someone who has control over something or someone.
    2. an expert at something.
    3. the original of a document or of a recording.
    4. (education) a master's degree; a type of postgraduate degree, usually undertaken after a bachelor degree.
      Synonym: magister

Affixed termsEdit

CompoundsEdit

Further readingEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

master m or f

  1. indefinite plural of mast

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English master. Doublet of magister.

NounEdit

master m (definite singular masteren, indefinite plural masterar, definite plural masterane)

  1. a master's degree
  2. a master's thesis
  3. a person that has a master's degree
  4. original document or recording

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

master f (definite singular mastra or mastri, indefinite plural mastrer, definite plural mastrene)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by mast

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

master f

  1. indefinite plural of mast

ReferencesEdit


Old FrisianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Vulgar Latin *maester, from Latin magister. Cognates include Old English mæġester and Old Saxon mēstar.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

māster m

  1. master
  2. leader
  3. commissioner

InflectionEdit

DescendantsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN, page 28

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

master

  1. indefinite plural of mast

AnagramsEdit


West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

master c (plural masters, diminutive masterke)

  1. master

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • master”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011