palliative

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French palliatif, from New Latin *palliātīvus, from Medieval Latin palliō (to cloak), from Latin pallium (a cloak).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpalɪətɪv/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈpæli.eɪtɪv/, /ˈpæli.ətɪv/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

palliative (comparative more palliative, superlative most palliative)

  1. Serving to palliate; serving to extenuate or mitigate.
  2. (medicine) Minimising the progression of a disease and relieving undesirable symptoms for as long as possible, rather than attempting to cure the (usually incurable) disease.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

palliative (plural palliatives)

  1. (medicine) Something that palliates, particularly a palliative medicine.
    The radiation and chemotherapy were only palliatives.
    • 1842, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Lady Anne Granard, volume 2, page 66:
      Mary heard with sorrow, and fear also, of the projected journey; but the altered expression of Isabella's countenance was a great palliative—dreadful as it was that her husband should love another...

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

palliative

  1. feminine singular of palliatif

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

palliative

  1. inflection of palliativ:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pal.ljaˈti.ve/
  • Rhymes: -ive
  • Hyphenation: pal‧lia‧tì‧ve

AdjectiveEdit

palliative

  1. feminine plural of palliativo