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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English palmer, from Anglo-Norman palmer, from Old French paumier (palmer), from Medieval Latin palmārius (palmer), from palma (palm tree).

NounEdit

palmer (plural palmers)

  1. (now historical) A pilgrim who had been to the Holy Land and who brought back a palm branch in signification; a wandering religious votary.
    • 1674, Thomas Staveley, The Romish horseleech : or, an impartial account of the intolerable charge of Popery to this nation, p. 93:
      The Pilgrim had some home or dwelling place, the Palmer had none. The Pilgrim travelled to some certain, designed place or places, but the Palmer to all. The Pilgrim went as his own charge, but the Palmer professed wilful poverty and went upon alms.
    • 1820, John Keats, “Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil. A Story from Boccaccio.”, in Lamia, Isabella, the Eve of St. Agnes, and Other Poems, London: Printed [by Thomas Davison] for Taylor and Hessey, [], OCLC 927360557, stanza I, page 49:
      Fair Isabel, poor simple Isabel! / Lorenzo, a young palmer in Love's eye! / They could not in the self-same mansion dwell / Without some stir of heart, some malady; [...]

Etymology 2Edit

From noun

NounEdit

palmer (plural palmers)

  1. A ferule used to punish schoolboys by striking their palms.

Etymology 3Edit

From the transitive verb to palm.

NounEdit

palmer (plural palmers)

  1. One who palms or cheats, as at cards or dice.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

palma +‎ -er

NounEdit

palmer m (plural palmers)

  1. palm tree

LatinEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

 
A medieval stained glass window depicting pilgrims, from the Cathedral of Canterbury, England.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Named for the palm branches they were wont to bring back from the Levant to signify their pilgrimage. From Anglo-Norman palmer, from Old French paumier, from Medieval Latin palmārius (palmer), from palma (palm tree).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

palmer (plural palmeres)

  1. A pilgrim who has been to the Holy Land.
    • ca. 1370–90, William Langland, Piers Plowman,
      Pilgrims and palmers plighted them together
      To seek for Saint James and the saintes in Rome ...
    • Geoffrey Chaucer, Canterbury Tales, General Prologue, ll. 13–15:
      Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,
      And palmeres for to seken strange stroundes
      To ferne halwes, kouthe in sondry londes.
      Then do folk long to go on pilgrimage,
      And palmers to go seeking out strange strands,
      To distant shrines well known in sundry lands.
  2. (by extension) Any pilgrim or crusader.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: palmer

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

palmer m

  1. indefinite plural of palme

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

palmer

  1. indefinite plural of palm