pilgrim

See also: Pilgrim

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English pilegrim, from Old French pelegrin, from Latin peregrīnus (foreigner). Doublet of peregrine.

The change of –r...r– to –l...r– is an effect of dissimilation in early Romance; compare Italian cognate pellegrino.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɪlɡɹɪm/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pil‧grim

NounEdit

pilgrim (plural pilgrims)

  1. One who travels, especially on a journey to visit sites of religious significance.
    • Bible, Hebrews xi. 13
      strangers and pilgrims on the earth
  2. (slang) A newcomer.
  3. (historical) A silk screen formerly attached to the back of a woman's bonnet to protect the neck.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pilgrim (third-person singular simple present pilgrims, present participle pilgriming, simple past and past participle pilgrimed)

  1. (intransitive) To journey; to wander; to ramble.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Grew to this entry?)

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse pílagrímr (pilgrim), from Medieval Latin pelegrinus, from Latin peregrīnus (foreigner, traveler).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pilɡrɛm/, [ˈpʰilˌɡ̊ʁɛmˀ], [ˈpʰilˌɡ̊ʁɛm] or IPA(key): /piːlɡrɛm/, [ˈpʰiːlˌɡ̊ʁɛmˀ], [ˈpʰiːlˌɡ̊ʁɛm]

NounEdit

pilgrim c (singular definite pilgrimmen, plural indefinite pilgrimme)

  1. pilgrim (traveller, especially to religious sites)

InflectionEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

pilgrim (plural pilgrimes)

  1. Alternative form of pilegrim

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse pílagrímr (pilgrim), from Medieval Latin pelegrinus, from Latin peregrīnus (foreigner, traveler).

NounEdit

pilgrim c

  1. pilgrim

DeclensionEdit

Declension of pilgrim 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative pilgrim pilgrimen pilgrimer pilgrimerna
Genitive pilgrims pilgrimens pilgrimers pilgrimernas

Derived termsEdit