perceptible

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin perceptibilis, from Latin percipio.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

perceptible (comparative more perceptible, superlative most perceptible)

  1. Able to be perceived, sensed, or discerned.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, in The Celebrity:
      Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke. [] A silver snaffle on a heavy leather watch guard which connected the pockets of his corduroy waistcoat, together with a huge gold stirrup in his Ascot tie, sufficiently proclaimed his tastes. [] But withal there was a perceptible acumen about the man which was puzzling in the extreme.
    Her voice was barely perceptible over the noise, but her gestures made her meaning clear.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

perceptible (plural perceptibles)

  1. Anything that can be perceived.

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin perceptibilis (from Latin percipio), equivalent to percebre +‎ -ible.

AdjectiveEdit

perceptible (masculine and feminine plural perceptibles)

  1. perceptible
    Antonym: imperceptible

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin perceptibilis (from Latin percipio).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

perceptible (plural perceptibles)

  1. perceptible
    • 1876, M. Bouilly, Archives Générales de Médecine[1], page 464:
      A ce niveau, cibrations thoraciques faibles, mais perceptibles ; voix un peu éloignée, mais sans aucun timbre ægophonique.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin perceptibilis (from Latin percipio).

AdjectiveEdit

perceptible (plural perceptibles)

  1. perceptible

Related termsEdit