EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Unknown; perhaps a variant of pest, pox.

NounEdit

pize (countable and uncountable, plural pizes)

  1. (Britain, regional, archaic) Used in various imprecatory expressions: a pest, a pox. [from 17th c.]
    • 1695, [William] Congreve, Love for Love: A Comedy. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 1227592604, Act V, scene ii, page 77:
      Pize on 'em, they never think beforehand of any thing;—and if they commit Matrimony, 'tis as they commit Murder; out of a Frolick: And are ready to hang themſelves, or to be hang'd by the Law, the next Morning.— []
    • 1751, [Tobias] Smollett, “He is Visited by Pallet; Contracts an Intimacy with a New Market Nobleman; and is by the Knowing Ones Taken in”, in The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle [], volume IV, London: Harrison and Co., [], published 1781, OCLC 316121541, page 338, column 1:
      Ah! a pize upon it! Dick, after all, was the man.
    • 1818, James Ford, editor, The Suffolk Garland: Or, A Collection of Poems, Songs, Tales, Ballads:
      Dame, what makes your ducks to die? / What the pize ails 'em? What the pize ails 'em?

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

pize (third-person singular simple present pizes, present participle pizing, simple past and past participle pized)

  1. (transitive, dialect, Yorkshire) To strike or hit (a person).

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pize

  1. dative/locative singular of piha

WutunhuaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Mandarin 皮子 (pízi).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pize

  1. skin
  2. leather
    gu-jhege pize quandi quan-di-li=a?
    Do they wear leather clothes?
    (Quoted in Sandman, p. 96)

ReferencesEdit

  • Erika Sandman (2016) A Grammar of Wutun[1], University of Helsinki (PhD), →ISBN