EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From the plural of Middle English pocke. See also pock.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pox (countable and uncountable, plural poxes)

  1. A disease characterized by purulent skin eruptions that may leave pockmarks.
  2. Syphilis.
  3. (figuratively) A curse.
    • c. 1605, William Shakespeare, All's Well That Ends Well, act IV, scene 3
      A pox on him, he's a cat still.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pox (third-person singular simple present poxes, present participle poxing, simple past and past participle poxed)

  1. (transitive, dated) To infect with the pox, or syphilis.
    • [1750?], Dr. [John] Arbuthnot, “The History of John Bull: Part II, Chapter III”, in The History of John Bull [by Dr. Arbuthnot]. And Poems on ſeveral Occasions by Dr. Jonathan Swift, with Several Miſcellaneous Pieces, by Dr. Swift and Mr. Pope, London: D. Midwinter, A. Tonson, page 60:
      Jack had a moſt ſcandalous tongue, and perſuaded Peg that all mankind, beſides himſelf, were pox'd by that ſcarlet-faced whore, †Signiora Bubonia. “As for his brother Lord Peter, the tokens were evident on him, blotches, ſcabs, and the corona. []

AzerbaijaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *bok (dirt, dung). Cognate with Turkish bok, Chuvash пӑх (păh) etc.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pox (definite accusative poxu, plural poxlar)

  1. shit (solid excretory product evacuated from the bowel)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


Coatlán MixeEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pox

  1. guava