platan

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin platanus; later reborrowed from Middle French platane.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

platan ‎(plural platans)

  1. (now rare, literary) A planetree.
    • 1633, John Donne, "The Autumnall":
      Xerxes strange Lydian love, the Platane tree, / Was lov'd for age, none being so large as shee [...].
    • Alfred, Lord Tennyson
      A double hill ran up his furrowy forks / Beyond the thick-leaved platans of the vale.

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Greek πλάτανος ‎(plátanos). Compare the doublet paltin. Cf. also Romanian platan.

NounEdit

platan m ‎(plural platanj)

  1. plane tree

SynonymsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from German Platane from Latin platanus from Ancient Greek πλάτανος ‎(plátanos).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

platan m

  1. plane tree, any tree of genus Platanus

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ platan in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007

EsperantoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

platan

  1. accusative singular of plata

IcelandicEdit

NounEdit

platan

  1. definite nominative singular of plata

PolishEdit

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

platan m inan

  1. plane tree, any tree of genus Platanus

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Greek πλάτανος ‎(plátanos), partially through the French intermediate platane.

NounEdit

platan m ‎(plural platani)

  1. plane tree

See alsoEdit

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