See also: Plane, Pläne, plané, plañe, pláne, and pláně

English

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /pleɪn/
  • Audio (UK); a plane [ə pʰlɛɪ̯n]:(file)
  • Audio (US); [pʰl̥ẽːn]:(file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪn
  • Homophone: plain

Etymology 1

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From Latin plānum (flat surface), a noun use of the neuter of plānus (plain). The word was introduced in the 17th century to distinguish the geometrical senses from the other senses of plain. Doublet of llano, piano, and plain.

Adjective

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plane (comparative planer, superlative planest)

  1. Of a surface: flat or level.
Translations
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Noun

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plane (plural planes)

  1. A level or flat surface.
  2. (geometry) A flat surface extending infinitely in all directions (e.g. horizontal or vertical plane).
    • 1979 August, Graham Burtenshaw, Michael S. Welch, “O.V.S. Bulleid's SR loco-hauled coaches - 1”, in Railway World, page 396:
      Mirrors in the compartments have been canted out of the vertical plane to reduce reflections to the passengers when seated.
    1. (anatomy) An imaginary plane which divides the body into two portions.
  3. A level of existence or development.
    • 1982 December 4, Catherine Joseph, “Empowered into Enlightenment”, in Gay Community News, volume 10, number 20, page 8:
      Nettie's stories about her experiences in Africa point out many parallels between the African and American ways of life. Her stories about the African lifestyle and family structure, in particular, point out the sexist and oppressive conditions that women are forced to submit to on a global plane.
  4. A roughly flat, thin, often moveable structure used to create lateral force by the flow of air or water over its surface, found on aircraft, submarines, etc. (Compare wing, airfoil, hydrofoil.)
  5. (computing, Unicode) Any of 17 designated ranges of 216 (65,536) sequential code points each.
Hyponyms
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Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Irish: plána
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Etymology 2

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From Middle English plane, plaine, from Anglo-Norman plaine, from Late Latin plāna (planing tool).

Noun

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a rebate plane

plane (plural planes)

  1. (countable, carpentry) A tool for smoothing wood by removing thin layers from the surface.
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See also
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Verb

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plane (third-person singular simple present planes, present participle planing, simple past and past participle planed)

  1. (transitive, carpentry) To smooth (wood) with a plane.
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Etymology 3

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Clipping of aeroplane.

Alternative forms

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Noun

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plane (plural planes)

  1. An airplane; an aeroplane.
    • 2013 September 6, Tom Cheshire, “Solar-powered travel”, in The Guardian Weekly[1], volume 189, number 13, page 34:
      The plane is travelling impossibly slowly – 30km an hour – when it gently noses up and leaves the ground. With air beneath them, the rangy wings seem to gain strength; the fuselage that on the ground seemed flimsy becomes elegant, like a crane vaunting in flight. It seems not to fly, though, so much as float.
  2. (entomology) Any of various nymphalid butterflies, of various genera, having a slow gliding flight.
    Synonym: aeroplane
  3. (entomology) The butterfly Bindahara phocides, family Lycaenidae, of Asia and Australasia.
Derived terms
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Translations
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Verb

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Three PT boats planing, with their bows lifted out of the water.

plane (third-person singular simple present planes, present participle planing, simple past and past participle planed)

  1. (nautical, of a boat) To move in a way that lifts the bow out of the water.
  2. To glide or soar.
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Etymology 4

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From Middle English plane, borrowed from Old French plane, from Latin platanus, from Ancient Greek πλάτανος (plátanos), from πλατύς (platús, wide, broad).

Noun

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plane (plural planes)

  1. (countable) A deciduous tree of the genus Platanus.
  2. (Northern UK) A sycamore.
Derived terms
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Translations
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Further reading

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Anagrams

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Czech

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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plane

  1. third-person singular present of planout

French

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Pronunciation

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Adjective

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plane

  1. feminine singular of plan

Verb

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plane

  1. inflection of planer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams

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German

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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plane

  1. inflection of planen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Latin

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Etymology

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From plānus (intelligible, clear).

Pronunciation

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Adverb

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plānē (comparative plānius, superlative plānissimē)

  1. plainly (to the senses or understanding), distinctly, intelligibly
  2. (emphasising correctness) clearly, obviously
    1. (also used as an affirmative answer)
  3. wholly, utterly, thoroughly, quite
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Descendants

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References

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Further reading

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  • plane”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • plane”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • plane in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • plane in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Carl Meißner, Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to speak openly, straightforwardly: plane, aperte dicere
    • to banish all sad thoughts: omnem luctum plane abstergere

Anagrams

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Lithuanian

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Noun

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plane m

  1. locative singular of planas

Norwegian Nynorsk

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Adjective

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plane

  1. definite singular of plan
  2. plural of plan

Portuguese

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Verb

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plane

  1. inflection of planar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Swedish

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Adjective

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plane

  1. definite natural masculine singular of plan

Anagrams

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