See also: propulsión

English edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Medieval Latin propulsio, propulsionis, from the past participle of Latin propello (to drive forward, drive forth, drive away, drive out).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /pɹəˈpʌlʃən/
  • (file)

Noun edit

propulsion (countable and uncountable, plural propulsions)

  1. The process of propelling, driving, or pushing, typically forward or onward; a propulsive force or impulse.
  2. That which propels.
    • 1995, Joyce A. Hayes, Benjamin E. Goldberg, David M. Anderson, “Environmental Benefits of Chemical Propulsion”, in Ann F. Whitaker, editor, Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference, page 59:
      However, nuclear propulsion provides a very high specific impulse and consistent, long duration energy source.
    • 2013, Yung-Kang (Derby) Sun, Non-Propellant Propulsion for Space Flight, page 20:
      This propulsion provides an initial velocity for the vehicle in a short time span.
    • 2015, Peter Jedicke, Extreme Science: The Highway of Light and Other Man-Made Wonders, Scientific American:
      Solar-electric propulsion accelerates a spacecraft by means of a low-thrust ion jet.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

References edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Medieval Latin propulsiōnem, from Latin propulsus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

propulsion f (plural propulsions)

  1. propulsion [from 1640]

Related terms edit

Further reading edit