EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Historically (late Middle English) meant "expel, drive out". Borrowed from Latin propellō, from pro- (forward) and pellō (I push, I move).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /pɹəˈpɛl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

VerbEdit

propel (third-person singular simple present propels, present participle propelling, simple past and past participle propelled)

  1. (transitive) To provide an impetus for motion or physical action, to cause to move in a certain direction; to drive forward.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter V
      When it had advanced from the wood, it hopped much after the fashion of a kangaroo, using its hind feet and tail to propel it, and when it stood erect, it sat upon its tail.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To provide an impetus for non-physical change, to make to arrive to a certain situation or result.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 265e.
      I can discern your nature and see that even without any arguments (logoi) from me it will propel you to what you say you are drawn towards,
    • 2020 November 7, Chelsea Janes, “Kamala Harris, daughter of Jamaican and Indian immigrants, elected nation’s first female vice president”, in Washington Post[1]:
      Black women helped propel Harris and president-elect Joe Biden to victory by elevating turnout in places like Detroit, Milwaukee and Philadelphia.

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DanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English propeller.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /propɛl/, [pʰʁ̥oˈpɛlˀ]

NounEdit

propel c (singular definite propellen, plural indefinite propeller)

  1. propeller (mechanical device used to propel)

InflectionEdit

See alsoEdit