punctiliar

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Formed as punctili(o) +‎ -ar, initially as an alternative translation (instead of punctual) for the German punktuell.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

punctiliar (comparative more punctiliar, superlative most punctiliar)

  1. (grammar) Of or pertaining to an unextended point of time:
    1. (of an action) Occurring at a definite and particular point in time.
    2. (of verbal aspect or tense) Relating to a punctiliar action or event.

SynonymsEdit

  • (grammar: of or pertaining to an unextended point of time [+ subsenses]): punctual

AntonymsEdit

  • (grammar: of or pertaining to an unextended point of time [+ subsenses]): durative

ReferencesEdit

NounEdit

punctiliar (plural punctiliars)

  1. (grammar) A verb denoting a punctiliar action or activity.
    • 1943, Richard C. H. Lenski, The Interpretation of St. Matthew’s Gospel 1–14, Augsburg Fortress (2008), →ISBN, page 289:
      First two duratives to express our practice of judging and measuring, then two punctiliars (aorists) to state God’s reciprocations.
    • 1996, University of Maryland Working Papers in Linguistics: UMD WPL IV–VI, page 122:
      Many researchers observe similar generalizations: that children seem unwilling to mark activity verbs like walk or unbounded punctiliars like jump with an -ed ending, even though this is a tense marker in the adult language that applies to all types of events.

SynonymsEdit

  • (grammar: verb denoting a punctiliar action): punctual

AntonymsEdit

  • (grammar: verb denoting a punctiliar action): durative