EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish queso, as found in Tex-Mex cuisine. Doublet of cheese.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

queso (uncountable)

  1. Melted cheese, used for instance as a dipping sauce.

Derived termsEdit


Old SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cāseum, accusative of cāseus. Cognate with Old Leonese keso and Old Portuguese queijo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

queso m (plural quesos)

  1. cheese
    • c. 1250: Alfonso X, Lapidario, f. 12v.
      Et ſi la fregan con la leche. lo q́ ende ſale, quaia toda la leche ſobre q́ la pongan ¬ por ende los daq́lla tierra uſan della en ſus q́sos. ¬ en toda otra coſa de leche q́ quieré quaiar.
      And if they wash it with milk, what results from it curdles the milk into which it is put, and so the people of that land use it in their cheeses, or in any other dairy thing they wish to curdle.

DescendantsEdit

  • Ladino: kézo
  • Spanish: queso (see there for further descendants)

SpanishEdit

 
Queso

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish queso, from Latin cāseus, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kwat- (to ferment).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

queso m (plural quesos)

  1. cheese
    Synonym: formaje
  2. (Spain, colloquial) foot

Derived termsEdit

(diminutive quesillo or quesito or quesín)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

All are borrowed.

Further readingEdit