English edit

 Pie (disambiguation) on Wikipedia
 
Unsliced lemon meringue pie.

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English pye, pie, pey, perhaps from Old English *pīe (pastry) (compare Old English pīe, pēo (insect, bug)), attested in early Middle English piehus (bakery, literally pie-house) c. 1199. Relation to Medieval Latin pica, pia (pie, pastry) is unclear, as there are no similar terms found in any Romance languages; therefore, like Irish pióg (pie), the Latin term may have been simply borrowed from the English.

Some sources state the word comes from Latin pīca (magpie, jay) (from the idea of the many ingredients put into pies likened to the tendency of magpies to bring a variety of objects back to their nests), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)peyk- (woodpecker; magpie), though this has its controversies. However, if so, then it is a doublet of pica.

Noun edit

pie (countable and uncountable, plural pies)

  1. A type of pastry that consists of an outer crust and a filling.
    The family had steak and kidney pie for dinner and cherry pie for dessert.
  2. Any of various other, non-pastry dishes that maintain the general concept of a shell with a filling.
    Shepherd's pie is made of mince covered with mashed potato.
  3. (Northeastern US) A pizza.
  4. A paper plate covered in cream, shaving foam or custard that is thrown or rubbed in someone’s face for comical purposes, to raise money for charity, or as a form of political protest; a custard pie; a cream pie.
  5. (figuratively) The whole of a wealth or resource, to be divided in parts.
    • 2010 December 4, Evan Thomas, “Why It’s Time to Worry”, in Newsweek[1]:
      It is easier to get along when everyone, more or less, is getting ahead. But when the pie is shrinking, social groups are more likely to turn on each other.
  6. (cricket) An especially badly bowled ball.
  7. A pie chart.
    • 1986, Carolyn Sorensen, Henry J. Stock, Department of Education Computer Graphics Guide, page 8:
      Pies are best for comparing the components of only one or two totals.
  8. (informal) Something very easy; a piece of cake.
    • 1989, PC Mag, volume 8, number 5, page 91:
      Programmers haven't exactly been wild about certain Microsoft policies — such as the price of the OS/2 developer's kit or the fib about how Microsoft Windows code would be pie to translate to the Presentation Manager.
  9. (slang) The vulva.
    • 1981, William Kotzwinkle, Jack in the Box:
      "Yeah, take it off!" "SHOW US YOUR PIE!" The brunette opened the catch on her G-string and let the sequinned cloth slip down, teasing them with it.
    • 2010, W. A. Moltinghorne, Magnolia Park, page 238:
      Yeah, some guys like to eat the old hairy pie. Women, too, or so I've heard.
  10. (slang) A kilogram of drugs, especially cocaine.
    • 1997 January 3, “Can't Nobody Hold Me Down”‎[2]performed by Sean Combs ft. Mase:
      Did fed time outta town pie flipper / Turn Cristal into a crooked-I sipper
    • [1998 October 18, “Ebonics”‎[3]performed by Big L:
      My weed smoke is my lye, a ki of coke is a pie / When I'm lifted I'm high, with new clothes on I'm fly]
    • 1999 July 13, “Discipline”‎[4]performed by Gang Starr ft. Total:
      I love the cutie pies, never the zootie pies
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Bulgarian: пай (paj)
  • Cantonese: (pai1)
  • Finnish: pai
  • Hebrew: ⁧פַּאי
  • Japanese: パイ
  • Korean: 파이 (pai)
  • Malay: pai
  • Persian: ⁧پای(pây)
  • Scottish Gaelic: pàidh
  • Spanish: pay
  • Swedish: paj
  • Tok Pisin: pai
  • Welsh: pei
  • Yiddish: ⁧פּײַ(pay)
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also edit

Verb edit

pie (third-person singular simple present pies, present participle pieing, simple past and past participle pied)

  1. (transitive) To hit in the face with a pie, either for comic effect or as a means of protest (see also pieing).
    I'd like to see someone pie the chairman of the board.
  2. (transitive) To go around (a corner) in a guarded manner.
  3. (transitive, UK, slang, often followed by off) To ignore (someone).
    • 2017, Marcel Somerville, Dr Marcel's Little Book of Big Love: Your Guide to Finding Love, the Island Way, London: Blink Publishing, →ISBN, page 50:
      Some of my friends drop everyone out as soon as they get a girlfriend, and they alienate people. Or they stop going out to the gym and doing things they love because they're all about the other person. When you do that you're sacrificing yourself and you will be left with nothing if you split up. You'll have to start again and get back in contact with all your mates you've pied off. Shame.
    • 2018 September 18, @_kirstenanna, Twitter[5], archived from the original on 27 January 2024:
      just my luck been put in a presentation group at uni with a guy I pied on tinder last week HAHA gud
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English pye, from Old French pie, from Latin pīca, feminine of pīcus (woodpecker), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)peyk- (woodpecker; magpie). Cognate with speight. Doublet of pica.

Noun edit

pie (plural pies)

  1. (obsolete) Magpie.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Hindi पाई (pāī, quarter), from Sanskrit पादिका (pādikā).

Noun edit

pie (plural pie or pies)

  1. (historical) The smallest unit of currency in South Asia, equivalent to 1192 of a rupee or 112 of an anna.
    • 1888, Rudyard Kipling, “The Strange Ride of Morrowbie Jukes”, in The Phantom ’Rickshaw and Other Tales, Folio Society, published 2005, page 117:
      I gave him all the money in my possession, Rs.9.8.5. – nine rupees, eight annas, and five pie – for I always keep small change as bakshish when I am in camp.
Translations edit

Etymology 4 edit

From Hindi पाहि (pāhi, migrant farmer, passer-through), from Sanskrit पार्श्व (pārśva, side, vicinity).

Noun edit

pie (plural pies)

  1. (zoology) Ellipsis of pie-dog: an Indian breed, a stray dog in Indian contexts.

Etymology 5 edit

From Spanish pie (foot, Spanish foot), from Latin pēs (foot, Roman foot), from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds. Doublet of foot, pes, and pous.

Noun edit

pie (plural pies)

  1. (historical) A traditional Spanish unit of length, equivalent to about 27.9 cm.
    Synonym: foot (in Spanish contexts)
Coordinate terms edit

Etymology 6 edit

Noun edit

pie

  1. (letterpress typography) Alternative form of pi (metal type that has been spilled, mixed together, or disordered)

Verb edit

pie (third-person singular simple present pies, present participle pieing, simple past and past participle pied)

  1. (transitive) Alternative form of pi (to spill or mix printing type)
    • 1943, Esther Forbes Hoskins, Johnny Tremain:
      The door of the [printing] shop was shattered. He went in. The presses were broken. The type pied.

References edit

Anagrams edit

Asturian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pes, pedem.

Noun edit

pie m (plural pies)

  1. foot

Related terms edit

Esperanto edit

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

pie

  1. piously
    • 1922, Ivan H. Krestanoff (tr.), “En la tombejo”, in Nuntempaj Rakontoj[6], Leipzig: Ferdinand Hirt & Sohn, translation of original by G. P. Stamatov, page 15:
      Nadja pie stariĝis apud la kruco.
      Nadia piously stood next to the cross.

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old French pie, from Latin pīca (magpie), feminine of pīcus (woodpecker).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

 
une pie

pie f (plural pies)

  1. magpie

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Galician edit

Verb edit

pie

  1. (reintegrationist norm) inflection of piar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Italian edit

Adjective edit

pie f pl

  1. feminine plural of pio

Anagrams edit

Latin edit

Etymology 1 edit

Adverb edit

piē (comparative pius, superlative pissimē)

  1. piously, devoutly
  2. dutifully, loyally

Etymology 2 edit

Adjective edit

pie

  1. vocative masculine singular of pius

References edit

  • pie”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pie”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pie in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[7], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to show an affectionate regard for a person's memory: memoriam alicuius pie inviolateque servare
    • (ambiguous) to be an earnest worshipper of the gods: deos sancte, pie venerari

Latvian edit

Preposition edit

pie (with genitive)

  1. at
    es biju pie tēvaI was at my father's
  2. on
    māja pie jūrasa house on the sea
  3. to
    braukšu pie tevisI will go to your place

Mandarin edit

Romanization edit

pie

  1. Nonstandard spelling of piē.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of piě.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of piè.

Usage notes edit

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Medieval Latin pīca.

Noun edit

pie

  1. Alternative form of pye (pie)

Etymology 2 edit

From Old French pie.

Noun edit

pie

  1. Alternative form of pye (magpie)

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Old French pie, from Latin pica, feminine of picus (woodpecker).

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Noun edit

pie f (plural pies)

  1. (Jersey) female magpie

Synonyms edit

Coordinate terms edit

The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. For synonyms and antonyms you may use the templates {{syn|nrf|...}} or {{ant|nrf|...}}.

Old English edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pīe f

  1. Alternative form of pēo

Old French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pīca.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pie oblique singularf (oblique plural pies, nominative singular pie, nominative plural pies)

  1. magpie

Descendants edit

Old Spanish edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pedem, singular accusative of pēs, from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pie m (plural pies)

  1. (anatomy) foot
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 28r:
      Vinierõ al flũ con el arca del teſtamẽt e q̃ndo cataron los pies de los ſac̃dotes enel agua partierõ ſe las aguas adieſtro ⁊ aſinieſtro e eſtidierõ cuemo mõtõ []
      They came to the river with the Ark of the Testimony, and when the feet of the priests touched the water the waters parted to the right and to the left, and they stood up like a heap []
  2. foot; the base of a mountain
    • c. 1200, Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 18r:
      Aduxo moẏſẽ el pueblo del albergada. Al encuẽtro del nr̃o sẽnor e eſtidierõ al pie del mõt en mõte sẏnaẏ.
      Moses led the people from the camp to meet Our Lord, and they stood at the foot of the mountain, Mount Sinai.

Descendants edit

Portuguese edit

Verb edit

pie

  1. inflection of piar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Scots edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English pye

Noun edit

pie (plural pies)

  1. pie (particularly savoury)

Spanish edit

 
Los pies de un hombre.

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old Spanish pie, from Latin pedem.

Cognate with Asturian pie, Galician and Portuguese , and Catalan peu. As an English unit, a calque of English foot.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpje/ [ˈpje]
  • Rhymes: -e
  • Syllabification: pie

Noun edit

pie m (plural pies)

  1. foot (a part of the body)
    Synonym: (of an animal) pata
  2. English or American foot (a unit of length equal to 30.48 cm)
  3. (historical, measure) pie, a Spanish foot (a former unit of length equivalent to about 27.9 cm)
    Synonym: tercia
  4. (poetry) foot (a part of a poetic line)
  5. (design, typography) footer (the bottom of a page or design)
Alternative forms edit
Coordinate terms edit
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpje/ [ˈpje], /piˈe/ [piˈe]
  • Rhymes: -e
  • Syllabification: pie, pi‧e

Verb edit

pie

  1. first-person singular preterite indicative of piar
Alternative forms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Unadapted borrowing from English pie.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pie m (plural pies)

  1. (Central America, South America) pie
Usage notes edit
  • Spanish-speaking Central and South Americans use the English loanword pie to refer to certain kinds of pies but not all kinds of pies. Some types of pies are referred to as tarta. It very much depends on the region for which term to use. Tarta is much more frequent, however.

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.

Alternative forms edit
Derived terms edit

Further reading edit