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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Aphetized from Middle English arayment, borrowed from Anglo-Norman arraiement, from Old French areement, from areer (to array). See array.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

raiment (countable and uncountable, plural raiments)

  1. (archaic or literary) Clothing, garments, dress, material.
    • William Shakespeare, Sonnet XXII, 5,6.
      For all that beauty that doth cover thee
      Is but the seemly raiment of my heart
    • 1866, Swinburne, Algernon, Aholibah, lines 11-12:
      Strange raiment clad thee like a bride,
      With silk to wear on hands and feet
    • 2006 December 24, Myers, PZ, “The Courtier's Reply”, in Pharyngula[1], retrieved 2011-10-30:
      We have entire schools dedicated to writing learned treatises on the beauty of the Emperor's raiment, and every major newspaper runs a section dedicated to imperial fashion...

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