reddendum

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Neuter of Latin reddendus (that must be given back or yielded), gerundive of reddere. See reddition.

NounEdit

reddendum (plural reddendums or reddenda)

  1. (law) A clause in a deed by which some new thing is reserved out of what had been granted before; the clause by which rent is reserved in a lease.
    • 1783, William Cruise, An Essay on the Nature and Operation of Fines:
      [] the cognizance supposing a preceding gift, the cognizor cannot reserve any thing to himself out of lands, of which he has already conveyed away the absolute property, so that the reddendum comes too late when a precedent absolute gift without any such reservation is before acknowledged.

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

reddendum

  1. nominative neuter singular of reddendus
  2. accusative masculine singular of reddendus
  3. accusative neuter singular of reddendus
  4. vocative neuter singular of reddendus