See also: Lease, léase, and -lease

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /liːs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːs

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English *lesen, from Anglo-Norman *leser, Old French lesser, laisier (to let, let go), partly from Latin laxō (to loose) and partly from Old High German lāzan (to let, let go, release) (German lassen), cognate with Old English lǣtan (to allow, let go, leave, rent) whence let.

NounEdit

lease (plural leases)

  1. (formal, law) An interest in land granting use or occupation of real estate for a limited period; a leasehold.
  2. The contract or deed under which such an interest is granted.
  3. The document containing such a contract or deed.
  4. The period of such an interest in land.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
HyponymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Dutch: leasen
  • English: leasing

VerbEdit

lease (third-person singular simple present leases, present participle leasing, simple past and past participle leased)

  1. (transitive, formal, law) To grant a lease as a landlord; to let.
  2. (transitive, informal) To hold a lease as a tenant.
    I'm leasing a small apartment in Runcorn for a month while I'm there for work.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English lesen, from Old English lesan (to collect, pick, select, gather), from Proto-West Germanic *lesan, from Proto-Germanic *lesaną (to gather).

VerbEdit

lease (third-person singular simple present leases, present participle leasing, simple past and past participle leased) (chiefly dialectal)

  1. (transitive) To gather.
  2. (transitive) To pick, select, pick out; to pick up.
  3. (transitive) To glean.
  4. (intransitive) To glean, gather up leavings.

QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:lease.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English lesen, from Old English lēasian (to lie, tell lies), from lēas (falsehood, lying, untruth, mistake).

VerbEdit

lease (third-person singular simple present leases, present participle leasing, simple past and past participle leased)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, UK dialectal) To tell lies; tell lies about; slander; calumniate.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Middle English lese, from Old English lǣs (meadow), from Proto-West Germanic *lāsu (meadow). See also leasow.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

lease (plural leases)

  1. An open pasture or common.
    • 1928, Thomas Hardy, He Never Expected Much:
      Since as a child I used to lie
      Upon the leaze and watch the sky,
      Never, I own, expected I
      That life would all be fair.

Etymology 5Edit

From Middle English lesen, from Old English līesan (to loosen, release, redeem, deliver, liberate), from Proto-Germanic *lausijaną (to release, loosen).

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

lease (third-person singular simple present leases, present participle leasing, simple past and past participle leased)

  1. (transitive, UK dialectal) To release; let go; unloose.

Etymology 6Edit

From leash.

NounEdit

lease (plural leases)

  1. The place at which the warp-threads cross on a loom.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from English lease.

NounEdit

lease f (plural leases, diminutive leaseje n)

  1. lease
    Synonym: pacht
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

lease

  1. first-person singular present indicative of leasen
  2. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of leasen
  3. imperative of leasen

Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lease

  1. Alternative form of les

NounEdit

lease

  1. Alternative form of les

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlæ͜ɑː.se/, [ˈlæ͜ɑː.ze]

AdjectiveEdit

lēase

  1. inflection of lēas:
    1. strong accusative feminine singular
    2. strong instrumental masculine/neuter singular
    3. strong nominative/accusative masculine/feminine plural
    4. weak nominative neuter/feminine singular