See also: léase

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lesen, from Old English lesan(to collect, pick, select, gather), from Proto-Germanic *lesaną(to gather), from Proto-Indo-European *les-(to gather). Cognate with Scots lease(to arrange, gather), Saterland Frisian leese(to gather, read), West Frisian lêze(to read), Dutch lezen(to gather, read), German lesen(to gather, read), Danish læse(to collect, read).

VerbEdit

lease ‎(third-person singular simple present leases, present participle leasing, simple past and past participle leased)

  1. (transitive, chiefly dialectal) to gather.
  2. (transitive, chiefly dialectal) to pick, select, pick out; to pick up.
  3. (transitive, chiefly dialectal) to glean.
  4. (intransitive, chiefly dialectal) to glean, gather up leavings.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English leas, lees, les, from Old English lēas(false, void, loose), from Proto-Germanic *lausaz(loose, free), from Proto-Indo-European *lū-(to untie, set free, sever). Cognate with German los(loose), Swedish lös(loose). More at loose.

AdjectiveEdit

lease ‎(comparative leaser or more lease, superlative leasest or most lease)

  1. false; lying; deceptive
Related termsEdit

NounEdit

lease ‎(plural leases)

  1. falsehood; a lie
    This is all lease. I don't believe it.
    • 1460-1500, The Towneley Playsː
      We held with him there he said lease, and therefore have we all unpeaceǃ
    • 1460-1500, The Towneley Playsː
      Ye shall have joy and bliss [] I say without lease.
    • 1460-1500, The Towneley Playsː
      He is so fair, without lease, he seems full well to sit on this.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English *leasien, from Old English lēasian(to lie, tell lies), from lēas(falsehood, lying, untruth, mistake).

VerbEdit

lease ‎(third-person singular simple present leases, present participle leasing, simple past and past participle leased)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, Britain dialectal) To tell lies; tell lies about; slander; calumniate.

Etymology 4Edit

From Middle English lese, from Old English lǣs(meadow), from Proto-Germanic *lēswō(meadow), from Proto-Indo-European *lēy-, *lēid-(to leave, let). Cognate with Old Saxon lēsa(meadow). See also leasow.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

lease ‎(plural leases)

  1. an open pasture or common
    • 1928, Thomas Hardy, He Never Expected Much:
      Since as a child I used to lie
      Upon the leaze and watch the sky,
      Never, I own, expected I
      That life would all be fair.

Etymology 5Edit

From Middle English lesen, from Old English līesan(to loosen, release, redeem, deliver, liberate), from Proto-Germanic *lausijaną(to release, loosen), from Proto-Indo-European *leu-(to cut, solve, separate). Cognate with Dutch lozen(to drain, discharge), German lösen(to release), Swedish lösa(to solve), Icelandic leysa(to solve).

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

lease ‎(third-person singular simple present leases, present participle leasing, simple past and past participle leased)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To release; let go; unloose.

Etymology 6Edit

From Middle English *lesen, from Anglo-Norman *leser, Old French lesser, laisier(to let, let go), from Medieval Latin lassō(to let, let go), partly from Latin laxō(to loose); partly from Old High German lāzzan, lāzan(to let, let go, release) (German lassen). Cognate with Old English lǣtan(to allow, let go, leave, rent). More at let.

VerbEdit

lease ‎(third-person singular simple present leases, present participle leasing, simple past and past participle leased)

  1. (transitive) To operate or live in some property or land through purchasing a long-term contract (or leasehold) from the owner (or freeholder).
  2. (transitive) To take or hold by lease.
  3. (intransitive) To grant a lease; to let or rent.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

lease ‎(plural leases)

  1. A contract granting use or occupation of property during a specified period in exchange for a specified rent
  2. The period of such a contract
  3. A leasehold
TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 7Edit

From leash.

NounEdit

lease

  1. The place at which the warp-threads cross on a loom.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit