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See also: dee'd and 'deed

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EnglishEdit

 
A deed of displacement (4).

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English dede, from Old English dēd, dǣd (deed, act), from Proto-Germanic *dēdiz (deed), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰéh₁tis (deed, action). Analyzable through Proto-Germanic as do +‎ -th. Cognate with West Frisian died, Dutch daad (deed, act), German Low German Daad, German Tat (deed, action), Swedish, Norwegian and Danish dåd (act, action). The Proto-Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek θέσις (thésis, setting, arrangement).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /diːd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːd

NounEdit

deed (plural deeds)

  1. An action or act; something that is done.
    • Bible, Genesis xliv. 15
      And Joseph said to them, What deed is this which ye have done?
  2. A brave or noteworthy action; a feat or exploit.
    • Spenser
      knightly deeds
    • Dryden
      whose deeds some nobler poem shall adorn
  3. Action or fact, as opposed to rhetoric or deliberation.
    I have fulfilled my promise in word and in deed.
  4. (law) A legal contract showing bond in form of a document.
    I inherited the deed to the house.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

deed (third-person singular simple present deeds, present participle deeding, simple past and past participle deeded)

  1. (informal) To transfer real property by deed.
    He deeded over the mineral rights to some fellas from Denver.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

deed

  1. singular past indicative of doen

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English dēad, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz.

AdjectiveEdit

deed

  1. dead (no longer alive)

DescendantsEdit


ScotsEdit