See also: dee'd and 'deed

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English dede, from Old English dēd, dǣd (deed, act), from Proto-West Germanic *dādi, from Proto-Germanic *dēdiz (deed), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰéh₁tis (deed, action). Analyzable through Proto-Germanic as do +‎ -th. Doublet of thesis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /diːd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːd

NounEdit

deed (plural deeds)

  1. An action or act; something that is done.
  2. A brave or noteworthy action; a feat or exploit.
  3. Action or fact, as opposed to rhetoric or deliberation.
    I have fulfilled my promise in word and in deed.
  4. (law) A legal instrument that is executed under seal or before witnesses.
    I inherited the deed to the house.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

deed (third-person singular simple present deeds, present participle deeding, simple past and past participle deeded)

  1. (informal) To transfer real property by deed.
    He deeded over the mineral rights to some fellas from Denver.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

deed

  1. singular past indicative of doen

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English dēad.

AdjectiveEdit

deed

  1. dead (no longer alive)
  2. inert, inactive.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: dead
  • Scots: dede, deid, deed
  • Yola: deed

ReferencesEdit


ScotsEdit

VerbEdit

deed

  1. past participle of dee
  2. (South Scots) past participle of dei

AdverbEdit

deed

  1. indeed

YolaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English deed.

AdjectiveEdit

deed

  1. dead

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith