See also: Redeemer

English

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Etymology

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From Middle English redemer, redemar, equivalent to redeem +‎ -er.

Noun

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redeemer (plural redeemers)

  1. One who redeems; one who provides redemption.
    • 1920, Edward Carpenter, Pagan and Christian Creeds, New York: Harcourt, Brace and Co., published 1921, page 137:
      However there is little doubt that Virgil did - in that very sad age of the world, an age of "misery and massacre," and in common with thousands of others - look for the coming of a great 'redeemer.'
    • 1968, Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces, 2nd edition, London: Fontana Press, published 1993, page 23:
      But these seekers, too, are saved - by virtue of the inherited symbolic aids of society, the rites of passage, the grace-yielding sacraments, given to mankind of old by the redeemers and handed down through millenniums.
    • 2018 May 4, Tom English, “Steven Gerrard: A 'seriously clever or recklessly stupid' Rangers appointment”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      With no experience in management, little knowledge of life in Scottish football, a dressing room to gut and replace, Gerrard is now cast in the role of Rangers' great redeemer. Whatever fate befalls him, this will not be dull.

Translations

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