regatte

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the Italian regatte, the plural form of regatta.

NounEdit

regatte

  1. plural of regatta
    • 2005: Bronwen Wilson, The World in Venice: Print, the City, and Early Modern Identity, page 168 (University of Toronto Press)
      Three days of festivities included regatte and war games.

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

regatte

  1. A cravat tied in such a way that two ends of material dangle from the knot.
    • 1949: CIBA Review, volume 6, issues 61–71, page 3,022 (CIBA Limited)
      The earliest cravats were simple silk ribbons tied in a bow in front. There was a second kind, the so-called regatte, representing an ordinary knot from which two long ends of ribbon hung down. The most ingenious form was the plastron, a more or less studied and compact interlacement of silk ribbon which filled the whole opening of the coat.