revivify

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French revivifier, from Latin revivificare, corresponding to re- +‎ vivify.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

revivify (third-person singular simple present revivifies, present participle revivifying, simple past and past participle revivified)

  1. (transitive) To reanimate, bring back to life.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 26
      His pure tight skin was an excellent fit; and closely wrapped up in it, and embalmed with inner health and strength, like a revivified Egyptian, this Starbuck seemed prepared to endure for long ages to come, and to endure always, as now; [...]
  2. (transitive) To reinvigorate or revitalize.
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Great Nation, Penguin 2003, p. 256:
      Despite the patrician allure of much that Choiseul attempted, a renovating, technocratic spirit was abroad during his tenure of office which sought to rationalize and revivify government service [...].
  3. (chemistry, transitive, now rare) To reactivate (a catalyst, reagent etc.).
  4. (chemistry, intransitive, now rare) To become effective again as a reagent etc.