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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin revolūtus, perfect passive participle of revolvō (roll back).

AdjectiveEdit

revolute (not comparable)

  1. Rolled or recurved on itself.
  2. (botany) Having the edges rolled with the abaxial side outward.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

revolute (third-person singular simple present revolutes, present participle revoluting, simple past and past participle revoluted)

  1. to roll back, curve upwards

Etymology 2Edit

Back-formation from revolution.

VerbEdit

revolute (third-person singular simple present revolutes, present participle revoluting, simple past and past participle revoluted)

  1. to participate in or incite a revolution or revolt
    • 1893, Daily Evening Expositor, editorial, January 28
      The Hawaiians have ‘revoluted’ and dethroned the fat squaw they have hitherto chosen to call a queen.
    • 1996, Lester D. Langley, The Banana Men: American Mercenaries and Entrepreneurs in Central America, 1880-1930
      Christmas always thought himself a “patriotic American,” but, as he saw the matter, a little “revoluting” on behalf of his benefactors—Manuel Bonilla and Estrada Cabrera—in no sense harmed the interestes of the United States.
    • 2000, Barbara Bush, Imperialism, Race and Resistance: Africa and Britain 1919-1945
      Achimota was Fraser’s life’s work, evidence that ‘the glorious West African people’ were gradually changing their conditions by ‘evolving not revoluting [sic]’.
    • 2003, Ed McClanahan, Famous People I Have Known
      I rocked and rolled. I ingested illicit substances. I revoluted.
    • 2004, Samuel Hopkins Adams, The Unspeakable Perk
      “Pins through scarabs,” she laughed, “while beneath you Caracuna riots and revolutes and massacres foreigners.

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

revolute

  1. Feminine plural form of revoluto

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

revolūte

  1. vocative masculine singular of revolūtus