CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of unknown origin. Possibly from Tatar чабата (çabata, overshoes), ultimately either from Ottoman Turkish چاپوت(çaput, çapıt, patchwork, tatters), from Ottoman Turkish چاپمق(çapmak, to slap on), or of Iranian origin, cognate with modern Persian چپت(čapat, a kind of traditional leather shoe).

Influenced by Old French bot savate. Cognate with Spanish zapata.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sabata f (plural sabates)

  1. shoe

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit


ChichewaEdit

EtymologyEdit

A borrowing introduced by the missionaries, but from an unclear source; probably Latin sabbatum or its source, Ancient Greek σάββατον (sábbaton).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sáˈɓa.ta/
  • IPA(key): /saˈɓa.tá/ (Southern Region)

NounEdit

sábata 5 (plural masábata 6)

  1. week
    Synonym: mlungu

NounEdit

sábata 9 (plural sábata 10)

  1. sabbath (in Christianity, Sunday)

Derived termsEdit


DalmatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sabbata, from sabbatum. Cognate with Romanian sâmbătă, Friulian sabide, Ladin sabeda, Romansch sonda, Italian sabato, French samedi, Spanish sábado.

NounEdit

sabata

  1. Saturday

EstonianEdit

NounEdit

sabata

  1. abessive singular of saba