English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Possibly a modification of Scottish Gaelic boiteag (maggot).

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

bot (plural bots)

  1. The larva of a botfly, which infests the skin of various mammals, producing warbles, or the nasal passage of sheep, or the stomach of horses.
    • 1946, Canadian Journal of Research: Zoological Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, page 76:
      One deer, later found to be heavily parasitized by bots, suffered severe vomiting attacks during the early spring.
    • 1984, Adrian Forsyth, Kenneth Miyata, Tropical Nature, page 157:
      Jerry prepared a glass jar with sterilized sand to act as a nursery for his pulsating bot, but despite his tender ministrations the larva dried out and died before it could encase itself in a pupal sheath.
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From bottom.

Verb edit

bot (third-person singular simple present bots, present participle botting, simple past and past participle botted)

  1. (Britain, slang) To bugger.
  2. (Australia, informal) To ask for and be given something with the direct intention of exploiting the thing’s usefulness, almost exclusively with cigarettes.
    Synonym: (UK) bum
    Can I bot a smoke?
    Jonny always bots off me. I just wish he’d get his own pack.

Etymology 3 edit

Clipping of robot.

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

bot (plural bots)

  1. (science fiction, informal) A physical robot.
    • 1998, David G. Hartwell, editor, Year's best SF 3, page 130:
      I stared at the bot and recognized her for the first time. She was me.
    • 2005, Greg Bear, Quantico[1], page 71:
      As he guided the bot, Andrews reminisced about his younger days in Wyoming, when he had witnessed a mishandled load of wheat puff out a dusty fog.
    • 2007, Peter F. Hamilton, The Dreaming Void[2]:
      The bot juddered to a halt, as the whole lower segment of its power arm darkened.
  2. (computing) A piece of software designed to perform a minor but repetitive task automatically or on command, especially when operating with the appearance of a (human) user profile or account.
    • 2009, Ryan Farley, Xinyuan Wang, “Roving Bugnet: Distributed Surveillance Threat and Mitigation”, in Dimitris Gritzalis, Javier López, editors, Emerging Challenges for Security, Privacy and Trust: 24th IFIP TC 11 International Information Security Conference[3], page 42:
      The goals of IRC bots vary widely, such as automatically kicking other users off or more nefarious things like spamming other IRC users. In this paper, a free standing IRC bot is presented that monitors an IRC channel for commands from a particular user and responds accordingly.
    • 2009, Richard K. Neumann, Legal Reasoning and Legal Writing: Structure, Strategy, and Style[4], page 91:
      He is particularly good at creating web robots, which are also called bots. A bot is software that searches for certain kinds of websites and then automatically does something — good or bad — on each site. Google uses bots to search and index websites.
    • 2010, Dusty Reagan, Twitter Application Development For Dummies[5], page 59:
      Twitter bots can leverage Twitter′s text message support to allow users to accomplish tasks from their cell phones. You could consider Twitter accounts that are simply an automated import of blog′s RSS feed a Twitter bot.
    • 2017 January 31, Adrienne LaFrance, “The Internet Is Mostly Bots”, in The Atlantic[6], retrieved 2021-09-01:
      Overall, bots—good and bad—are responsible for 52 percent of web traffic, according to a new report by the security firm Imperva, which issues an annual assessment of bot activity online.
  3. (video games) A computer-controlled character in a video game, especially a multiplayer one.
    Synonyms: NPC, AI
    • 2012, Philip Hingston, Believable Bots: Can Computers Play Like People?, Springer Science & Business Media, →ISBN, page 232:
      Most games offer both single player mode, in which a player competes against computer rivals—bots—and a multiplayer mode, which is a contest among people only.
  4. (video games, slang, derogatory) A supremely unskilled player.
    • 2021 March 6, Aydan Conrad (quoted), Wesley Yin-Poole, “Call of Duty: Warzone squad sets new world record with an astonishing 162 kills in a single game”, in Eurogamer[7]:
      "That lobby was bronze negative 10!" Aydan joked on-stream, noting how easy it felt for his squad. "We got blessed with the lobby. It was such a bot lobby."
  5. (Internet slang, figuratively) A person with no ability to think for themselves.
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

bot (third-person singular simple present bots, present participle botting, simple past and past participle botted)

  1. (video games) To use a bot, or automated program.
    Players caught botting will be banned from the server.
Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Dutch bot, from botte. Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *buddǭ.

Noun edit

bot (plural botte, diminutive botjie)

  1. sprout, bud

Verb edit

bot (present bot, present participle bot, past participle gebot)

  1. to sprout, to bud
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Dutch bot, from Middle Dutch bot. Ultimately from Proto-West Germanic *buttaz.

Adjective edit

bot (attributive botte, comparative botter, superlative botste)

  1. blunt, dull (of an object)
  2. obtuse, dull, stupid
Derived terms edit

Noun edit

bot (plural botte, diminutive botjie)

  1. a bone
  2. (fish) flounder, fluke, butt
    Synonym: botvis
  3. (parasitic flatworm) fluke
    Synonym: slakwurm

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

bot

  1. Alternative spelling of bod

References edit

Bislama edit

Etymology edit

From English boat.

Noun edit

bot

  1. boat

Catalan edit

Etymology 1 edit

Deverbal from botar.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bot m (plural bots)

  1. jump, leap
    Synonyms: salt, saltiró
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Middle English bot (whence English boat), from Old English bāt (boat), from Proto-Germanic *baitaz, *baitą (boat, small ship), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to break, split).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bot m (plural bots)

  1. boat
    Synonyms: barca, vaixell

Etymology 3 edit

Inherited from Late Latin buttis (wineskin), probably of Ancient Greek origin.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bot m (plural bots)

  1. wineskin
    Synonym: odre
  2. bagpipes
    Synonyms: bot de gemecs, cornamusa
  3. sunfish (large marine fish of the family Molidae)
    Synonym: mola
Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Etymology 4 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

bot

  1. inflection of botre:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Dalmatian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Possibly from a derivative of Latin battuō, or alternatively of Germanic origin. Compare Italian botta, French botte.

Noun edit

bot m

  1. blow, slap, smack, whack, knock, strike, thud

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Dutch bot, but, butte, related to Middle Low German but (dull, plump, coarse), West Frisian bot (blunt). Perhaps ultimately from Proto-West Germanic *butt, from Proto-Germanic *buttaz (end, butt).

Adjective edit

bot (comparative botter, superlative botst)

  1. not sharp, blunt, dull
    De schaar is te bot om het papier goed te knippen.
    The scissors are too blunt to cut the paper properly.
  2. impolite, badly behaving: curt, blunt, rude
    Zijn opmerking was nogal bot en kwetste haar gevoelens.
    His remark was quite impolite and hurt her feelings.
Inflection edit
Inflection of bot
uninflected bot
inflected botte
comparative botter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial bot botter het botst
het botste
indefinite m./f. sing. botte bottere botste
n. sing. bot botter botste
plural botte bottere botste
definite botte bottere botste
partitive bots botters
Descendants edit
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: dofu
  • Papiamentu: bòt

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle Dutch but. Cognate with English butt, German Butt, in all senses.

Noun edit

bot n (plural botten, diminutive botje n)

  1. bone
    Synonyms: been, knekel, knook
    De dokter heeft vastgesteld dat hij een gebroken bot heeft.
    The doctor has determined that he has a broken bone.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Middle Dutch bot. Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *buttaz (stumpy). Cognate with English butt (flatfish), German Butt (lefteye flounder), West Frisian bot (flounder).

Noun edit

bot m (plural botten, diminutive botje n)

  1. flounder (a type of fish)
    Ik heb een heerlijke bot gevangen tijdens het vissen.
    I caught a delicious flounder while fishing.
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Afrikaans: bot
  • West Frisian: bot

Etymology 4 edit

From French botte.

Noun edit

bot f (plural botten, diminutive botje n)

  1. (Belgium) boot

Etymology 5 edit

Borrowed from English bot, from robot.

Noun edit

bot m (plural bots, diminutive botje n)

  1. A bot (software for repetitive minor tasks; computer-controlled character in video games).
Related terms edit

French edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle French bot (16th c.). Of unknown origin. Perhaps ultimately from Proto-Germanic *buttaz (butt, stump, end). If so, a doublet of but.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

bot (feminine bote, masculine plural bots, feminine plural botes)

  1. (of a foot) affected by the deformation known as clubfoot
    un pied bota clubfoot
  2. (rare, of a hand) affected by a similar-looking deformation
    une main botea deformed hand

Etymology 2 edit

From English bot.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bot m (plural bots)

  1. (computing) bot

Further reading edit

German edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

bot

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of bieten

Hungarian edit

Etymology edit

From a Slavic, language, from Proto-Slavic *bъtъ.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bot (plural botok)

  1. stick, staff
  2. walking stick, cane
    Synonyms: sétabot, sétapálca

Declension edit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative bot botok
accusative botot botokat
dative botnak botoknak
instrumental bottal botokkal
causal-final botért botokért
translative bottá botokká
terminative botig botokig
essive-formal botként botokként
essive-modal
inessive botban botokban
superessive boton botokon
adessive botnál botoknál
illative botba botokba
sublative botra botokra
allative bothoz botokhoz
elative botból botokból
delative botról botokról
ablative bottól botoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
boté botoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
botéi botokéi
Possessive forms of bot
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. botom botjaim
2nd person sing. botod botjaid
3rd person sing. botja botjai
1st person plural botunk botjaink
2nd person plural bototok botjaitok
3rd person plural botjuk botjaik

Derived terms edit

Compound words with this term at the beginning
Compound words with this term at the end
Expressions

Further reading edit

  • bot in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • bot in Ittzés, Nóra (ed.). A magyar nyelv nagyszótára (‘A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2006–2031 (work in progress; published A–ez as of 2024)

Javanese edit

Romanization edit

bot

  1. Romanization of ꦧꦺꦴꦠ꧀

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old English bāt.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bot (plural botes)

  1. A seafaring vessel or watercraft; a device for navigating the waters:
    1. A boat (a watercraft or vessel smaller than a ship).
    2. A boat stowed on a ship for utility purposes, especially for tendering.
  2. (figurative) The path or course of one's life; one's direction.
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Norse búð.

Noun edit

bot

  1. Alternative form of bothe (booth)

Etymology 3 edit

From Old English batt.

Noun edit

bot

  1. Alternative form of bat

Etymology 4 edit

From Old English bōt.

Noun edit

bot

  1. Alternative form of bote (help, benefit)

Etymology 5 edit

From Old French bote.

Noun edit

bot

  1. Alternative form of bote (boot)

Middle Irish edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *bozdos (tail, penis) (compare Welsh both (hub, nave), Breton bod (bush, shrub; branch)), from Proto-Indo-European *gwosdʰos (piece of wood), compare Proto-Slavic *gvozdь (nail, tack, peg).

Noun edit

bot m

  1. tail
  2. penis

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Mutation edit

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
bot bot
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
mbot
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology edit

From Old Norse bót.

Noun edit

bot f or m (definite singular bota or boten, indefinite plural bøter, definite plural bøtene)

  1. a fine (sum of money to be paid as a penalty for an offence)
  2. a remedy
  3. a patch

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology edit

From Old Norse bót.

Noun edit

bot f (definite singular bota, indefinite plural bøter, definite plural bøtene)

  1. a fine (as above)
  2. a remedy
  3. a patch

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

Old English edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *bōtu (recompense).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bōt f (nominative plural bōte)

  1. help, assistance, rescue, remedy, cure, deliverance from evil
    • Byþ hræd bót.The cure will be quick.
  2. mending, repair, improvement
    • ... and án swulung þǽre cirican to bóteand an offering to the church for repairs
  3. compensation for an injury or wrong; (peace) offering, recompense, amends, atonement, reformation, penance, repentance
    • For bóte his synnafor a redressing of his sins
  4. improvement in (moral) condition, amendment
    • Hé tó bóte gehwearfhe was converted

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Old French edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Vulgar Latin *padda, probably a Germanic loan from Frankish *paddā (toad). Compare Italian botta (toad), Old English padde (toad), Old Norse padda (toad). More at paddock.

Noun edit

bot oblique singularf (oblique plural boz or botz, nominative singular bot, nominative plural boz or botz)

  1. toad (animal)
Derived terms edit

References edit

Etymology 2 edit

From boter (to strike), from Frankish *buttan, from *bautan (to hit, strike).

Noun edit

bot oblique singularm (oblique plural boz or botz, nominative singular boz or botz, nominative plural bot)

  1. strike; hit; blow
Synonyms edit

Etymology 3 edit

See bat.

Noun edit

bot oblique singularm (oblique plural boz or botz, nominative singular boz or botz, nominative plural bot)

  1. Alternative form of bat

Etymology 4 edit

See bout.

Noun edit

bot oblique singularm (oblique plural boz or botz, nominative singular boz or botz, nominative plural bot)

  1. Alternative form of bout

References edit

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (bot) (sense #1, 'toad' and #2, 'strike')
  • bot on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub (sense #3, 'boat' and a citation or sense #4, 'end')

Old Javanese edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bəʀəqat (compare Malay berat). Doublet of bwat and wrat.

Adjective edit

bot

  1. heavy
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *buhat. Doublet of bwat and wwat.

Noun edit

bot

  1. style, make
Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • "bot" in P.J. Zoetmulder with the collaboration of S.O. Robson, Old Javanese-English Dictionary. 's-Gravenhage: M. Nijhoff, 1982.

Old Swedish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse bót, from Proto-Germanic *bōtō.

Noun edit

bōt f

  1. improvement
  2. benefit, utility
  3. cure
  4. compensation

Declension edit

or

Descendants edit

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Old Czech bot, from French botte.

Noun edit

bot m inan (diminutive botek)

  1. ankle boot
Declension edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from English bot.

Noun edit

bot m animal

  1. (computing) bot
Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • bot in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bot in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English bot. Doublet of robô.

Pronunciation edit

 
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈbɔ.t͡ʃi/, (proscribed, but common) /ˈbu.t͡ʃi/
    • (Southern Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈbɔ.te/, (proscribed, but common) /ˈbu.te/

Noun edit

bot m (plural bots)

  1. (computing) bot (a piece of software for doing repetitive tasks)
  2. (video games) bot (a player controlled by software)

Romanian edit

Etymology 1 edit

Unknown. Possibly from a Vulgar Latin root *botum, perhaps from Latin botulus or from a root *botium, a Germanic borrowing, from Frankish *boce (knob), from Old High German bozzan (to beat), from Proto-West Germanic *bautan (to push, strike).[1]

Compare Italian bozza, French bosse. See also butuc and boț.

Noun edit

bot n (plural boturi)

  1. (of animals) snout, mouth
  2. (of a person, vulgar) mouth
  3. bump
  4. hump
  5. (vulgar) blowjob
Declension edit
Synonyms edit
See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ Walther von Wartburg (1928–2002), “*bottia”, in Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 1: A–B, page 469

Etymology 2 edit

From English bot.

Noun edit

bot m (plural boți)

  1. bot
Declension edit

Further reading edit

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English bot.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbot/ [ˈbot̪]
  • Rhymes: -ot
  • Syllabification: bot

Noun edit

bot m (plural bots)

  1. bot (robot)

Further reading edit

Swedish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Swedish bōt (improvement), from Old Norse ᛒᚢᛏ (but) (in the Latin script bót) whence also Icelandic bót), from Proto-Germanic *bōtō. Akin to English boot (remedy, profit). Masculine in Late Modern Swedish.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bot c

  1. fine (penalty in money)
Usage notes edit
  • In newer usage, the indefinite plural böter has frequently been reinterpreted as a singular noun due to usage without an article. Thus, for example, the common phrase "betala böter" has shifted in meaning from "pay fines" to "pay a fine". This is unrecognized by language authorities, however.
Declension edit
Declension of bot 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bot boten böter böterna
Genitive bots botens böters böternas
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Originally the same word as etymology 1.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bot c

  1. cure; remedy
  2. (religious) penance
Declension edit
Declension of bot 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bot boten boter boterna
Genitive bots botens boters boternas
Related terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Unadapted borrowing from English bot.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bot c

  1. bot (robot)
Declension edit
Declension of bot 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bot botten bottar bottarna
Genitive bots bottens bottars bottarnas
Declension of bot 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bot boten botar botarna
Genitive bots botens botars botarnas

Further reading edit

Tatar edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Turkic *būt (thigh).

Noun edit

bot

  1. thigh

Turkish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From French botte.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bot (definite accusative botu, plural botlar)

  1. boot

Etymology 2 edit

From English boat

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bot (definite accusative botu, plural botlar)

  1. boat
    Synonym: tekne

Volapük edit

Noun edit

bot (nominative plural bots)

  1. boat

Declension edit

West Frisian edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Frisian butie, from Proto-West Germanic *butt, from Proto-Germanic *buttaz (end piece), related to English butt.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

bot

  1. curt, blunt, rude
  2. dull (as a knife)
Inflection edit
Inflection of bot
uninflected bot
inflected botte
comparative botter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial bot botter it botst
it botste
indefinite c. sing. botte bottere botste
n. sing. bot botter botste
plural botte bottere botste
definite botte bottere botste
partitive bots botters
Further reading edit
  • bot (II)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Adverb edit

bot

  1. very, quite
Further reading edit
  • bot (II)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 2 edit

Uncertain. Possibly derived from bot (blunt-headed fish), in which case ultimately from the source of Etymology 1 above. Compare Dutch bot and the second element of English halibut.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bot c (plural botten, diminutive botsje or botke)

  1. flounder (a type of fish)
Further reading edit