See also: sängar

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Pashto سنګر(sangar) or from Persian سنگر(sangar).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sangar (plural sangars)

  1. (military, Britain) A stone breastwork; a fortified niche or look-out post.
    • 1990, Peter Hopkirk, The Great Game, Folio Society 2010, page 422:
      At the summits of these the enemy sharpshooters waited for them in sangars, or rock-built entrenchments, each of which had to be taken before the advance could safely continue.
    • 2002, Stephen Hughes, The Iraqi Threat and Saddam Hussein′s Weapons of Mass Destruction, page 140:
      A sangar is a breastwork in the form of stonewalls built without bounding material. If stones are unavailable at or near the picket site sandbags are brought in to build the sangar.
    • 2003, Mike Ryan, Secret Operations of the SAS, page 81:
      As the sun finally set, the rebels rushed the sangars, but were cut to pieces by the deadly accurate SAS fire.
    • 2007, David Humphry, Siege, page 205:
      The game′s up, thought Piet as the Burghers returned fire and moved forward to attack the sangar.

EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Finnish sankari

NounEdit

sangar (genitive sangari, partitive sangarit)

  1. hero

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit