scirpus

See also: Scirpus

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *(s)kerbʰ- (to turn (around), wind), cognate with corbis (basket), Ancient Greek κάρφος (kárphos), Old Church Slavonic крабии (krabii): Russian коробка (korobka, box), Czech krabice.

The figurative sense derives from the plaiting of rushes to make intricate patterns.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

scirpus m (genitive scirpī); second declension

  1. a rush, bulrush
  2. (figuratively) riddle, enigma

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative scirpus scirpī
Genitive scirpī scirpōrum
Dative scirpō scirpīs
Accusative scirpum scirpōs
Ablative scirpō scirpīs
Vocative scirpe scirpī

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • French: scirpe
  • Italian: scirpo
  • Translingual: Scirpus

ReferencesEdit

  • scirpus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • scirpus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • scirpus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • scirpus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette