scorpio

See also: Scorpio

LatinEdit

 
scorpius (a scorpion)

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek σκορπίος (skorpíos).

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈskor.pi.oː/, [ˈs̠kɔrpioː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈskor.pi.o/, [ˈskɔrpio]
  • (file)

NounEdit

scorpiō m (genitive scorpiōnis); third declension

  1. a scorpion
  2. a kind of prickly sea fish, possibly the scorpionfish or sculpin
  3. a kind of prickly plant
  4. (military) scorpion, a small catapult
    • Caesar, de Bello Gallico VII, 25:
      scorpione ab latere dextro traiectus exanimatusque concidit
      He was pierced and killed on the right side by a scorpion and fell

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative scorpiō scorpiōnēs
Genitive scorpiōnis scorpiōnum
Dative scorpiōnī scorpiōnibus
Accusative scorpiōnem scorpiōnēs
Ablative scorpiōne scorpiōnibus
Vocative scorpiō scorpiōnēs

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • scorpio”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • scorpio”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • scorpio in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • scorpio in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • scorpio”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • scorpio”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin