scorpion

See also: Scorpion

EnglishEdit

scorpion cheerleading move (3)

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English scorpioun, skorpioun, schorpion, schorpiun, partly from Old English sċorpio and partly from Anglo-Norman scorpïun, Old French scorpïon, escorpïon; all from Latin scorpio, ultimately from Ancient Greek σκορπίος (skorpíos). The cheerleading move is so called because of the resemblance of the raised foot to a scorpion's stinger.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈskɔː.pi.ən/, /-pɪ.ən/
  • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈskɔɹ.pi.ən/

NounEdit

scorpion (plural scorpions)

  1. Any of various arachnids of the order Scorpiones, related to the spiders, characterised by two large front pincers and a curved tail with a venomous sting in the end.
  2. (historical) An ancient military engine for hurling stones and other missiles.
  3. (figuratively) A very spiteful or vindictive person.
  4. A cheerleading move in which one foot is pulled back and held up with both hands while the performer stands on the other foot.
  5. (obsolete, biblical) A whip with points like a scorpion's tail.
    Coordinate term: scourge

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin scorpiō

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

scorpion m (plural scorpions)

  1. scorpion

DescendantsEdit

  • Romanian: scorpion

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

scorpion

  1. Alternative form of scorpioun

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French scorpion, from Latin scorpiō, scorpiōnem, from Ancient Greek σκορπίος (skorpíos).

NounEdit

scorpion m (plural scorpions)

  1. (Jersey) mole cricket

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French scorpion, from Latin scorpio, from Ancient Greek σκορπίος (skorpíos). Doublet of scorpie.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

scorpion m (plural scorpioni)

  1. scorpion

DeclensionEdit