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EtymologyEdit

 
The scouthouse in Bonin, Poznań, Poland

From scout +‎ house.

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NounEdit

scouthouse (plural scouthouses)

  1. (Scouting, US) A building where members of the Scout Movement hold their meetings.
    • 1935 October, “Explorers and Scouts: Scouting in the Oahu Stake”, in Heber J[eddy] Grant and John A[ndreas] Widtsoe, editors, The Improvement Era, volume 38, number 10, Salt Lake City, Ut.: Young Men’s Mutual Improvement Association Corporation of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, OCLC 1752702, page 634, column 1:
      In the summer of 1920 a second troop was started, and opened with a Scouthouse at Laie, windward Oahu, for the children of those missionaries living together in this happy settlement which radiates the true spirit of hospitality and kindness.
    • 1980, Frank A. Driskill; ‎Noel Grisham, Historic Churches of Texas: The Land and the People, Burnet, Tex.: Eakin Press, →ISBN, page 211:
      A new rectory, a youth center and a scouthouse were constructed []
    • 1982, Staffrider, volume 5, Braamfontein, Johannesburg: Ravan Press, ISSN 0258-7211, OCLC 475968887, page 83, column 1:
      Once, they thought they saw a light burning in a place which should have been dark. But it was only the reflection of the streetlamps shining on the scouthouse windows, and they did not even stop to investigate.
    • 1994 April 12, Phil Katz, “Tempo”, in rec.folk-dancing, Usenet[1], message-ID <2od0eh$ol6@news.u.washington.edu>:
      I've only been an out of town visitor at the Mon night scouthouse dances a few times, but I've never found it uninviting.

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