seedtime

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

seed +‎ time

Compare Old Icelandic sáðtími. Compare also German Saatzeit "season for sowing seed" (15th cent. as satzijt), Old Icelandic sáðtíð "April", lit. "seed time".[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsidˌtaɪm/
    • (file)

NounEdit

seedtime (countable and uncountable, plural seedtimes)

  1. The time to sow seeds.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 10”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      Seed time and Harvest, Heat and hoary Frost
      Shall hold thir course
  2. (figuratively) A time for new development.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “seed time, n.”, in Oxford English Dictionary, 3rd edition, 2018