English

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology

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separate +‎ -or

Noun

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separator (plural separators)

  1. An object located between two or more things and hence separating them.
    • 1998, Elisa Ferri, Lisa Kenny, Dana Epstein, Style on Hand: Perfect Nail and Skin Care, page 44:
      When applying polish, always use toe separators to keep toes apart.
  2. A device for removing one substance from another, such as cream from milk.
  3. One who separates; an agent performing the action of separating.
    • 1979 December 8, Nancy Walker, “Remembering David Brill”, in Gay Community News, volume 7, number 20, page 15:
      Death, the mystery, the great separator of friend from friend and loved one from loved one

Derived terms

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Translations

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Anagrams

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Latin

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Verb

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sēparātor

  1. second/third-person singular future passive imperative of sēparō

References

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  • separator”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • separator in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.

Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology

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Borrowed from English separator.[1]

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /sɛ.paˈra.tɔr/
  • Rhymes: -atɔr
  • Syllabification: se‧pa‧ra‧tor

Noun

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separator m inan

  1. separator (an object located between two or more things and hence separating them)
  2. separator (a device for removing one substance from another, such as cream from milk)

Declension

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References

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  1. ^ Mirosław Bańko, Lidia Wiśniakowska (2021) “separator”, in Wielki słownik wyrazów obcych, →ISBN

Further reading

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Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French séparateur, from Latin separator.

Noun

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separator n (plural separatori)

  1. separator

Declension

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