Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

serc

  1. Alternative form of serk

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *sterkā.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

serc f

  1. love (both sacred and profane)
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 7d8
      Do·beir-som ainm bráthre doib, arná·epret is ara miscuis in cúrsachad, act is ara seircc.
      He calls them brothers, lest they should say the reprimand is because of hatred for them, but it is because of love for them.
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 68b9
      cia beith ar n‑acathar nech inna rétu inducbaidi in betha so, arnach·corathar i mmoth ⁊ machthad dia seirc ⁊ dia n‑accubur
      though it be that someone sees the glorious things of this world, that he may not be put in stupor and admiration by love for them and by desire for them
  2. verbal noun of caraid

InflectionEdit

Feminine ā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative sercL
Vocative sercL
Accusative seircN
Genitive seirceH, sercae
Dative seircL
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: searc
  • Scottish Gaelic: seirc

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
serc ṡerc unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

serc n pl

  1. genitive plural of serce